Five things to get or see this month

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Issue: 
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Pioneering modern art - machines for living - radical exhibition - imperialist history - TV triumph


Duchamp, Man Ray and Picabia
Tate Modern
Until 26 May

Marcel Duchamp, Man Ray and Francis Picabia had a huge impact on contemporary and modern art, and were pioneers in the early 20th century.

Duchamp would remove everyday objects from their contexts and present them as a piece of art. Man Ray used avant-garde photographic and film techniques while Picabia undermined conventional forms of art in the use of popular and kitsch images to create his work.


Le Corbusier: the Art of Architecture
Cathedral of Christ the King, Liverpool, until January 2009

Le Corbusier talked of "machines for living in" but he was the architect who most embodied humanist, utopian modern architecture. The great engineer of 20th century domestic building, he was also an idealist, applying his skills to creating harmonious spaces for egalitarian, communal living.

This comprehensive exhibition shows in the Edwin Lutyens designed crypt of Liverpool's Metropolitan cathedral. It will move to London in January 2009.


Yes, No, Other Options*
Sheffield Contemporary Art Forum, until 30 March
www.artsheffield.org.uk

While the exhibition's ethos may have a debatable ideology (it is based on the postmodern thought that we have entered a "post-industrial society") it is an interesting subversion on the idea that we should all be dehumanised and subservient to employers as we stand behind the supermarket checkout or customer service desk.


Rhodes
DVD

This 1996 BBC series chronicling the life of British colonialist Cecil Rhodes is now available on DVD. It shows the man who conquered, and forced his name upon, "Rhodesia", and his pursuit of mass exploitation of Africans for the British Empire.


The Wire
DVD Season 4

Now finally available on DVD in Britain it is simply some of the best television you will ever watch. This penultimate season of an already stunning series will draw you in to the world of the corner kids, the education system that let them down and the politicians that pretend to care.

If you haven't caught The Wire yet, don't start here. Get season one and settle down for a treat.