Five Things to get or see

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Issue: 
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Hidden - Walking the Wall - The Biting Point - Made in Dagenham - Fair Game


Hidden
Museum of London, until April

There is still time to see Red Saunders's artworks which grace the walls of the Museum of London foyer. The three historical tableaux show black Chartist William Cuffay, the 18th century revolutionary Thomas Paine and Wat Tyler during the 1381 Peasants' Revolt.

Saunders says about his work, "History has been dominated by kings, queens, war and 'great men'. Hidden engages with a different historical narrative involving dissenters, revolutionaries and radicals."


Walking the Wall
Comedy tour

Comedian Mark Thomas's new stand-up tour relates his epic 750km walk along the route of the wall built by Israel to cut off huge chunks of the West Bank of Palestine. While the subject doesn't necessarily lend itself to a comedy routine, he manages to bring across the stories of those whose lives have been devastated by Israel's apartheid regime as well as his own experiences of attempting to document the horrors of occupation.


The Biting Point
Theatre 503, London, until 12 March

Set in the late 1970s and early 1980s, Sharon Clark's drama follows the lives of people intimately caught up in the race riots of the time. The story is based on Clark's own political development, and seeks to draw parallels to the situation we face today. The play has been described as a call to action, which in the context of the Con-Dem cuts at home and the struggles in the Middle East seems timely.


Made In Dagenham
DVD, out 28 March

The story of the historic strike by women machinists at the Ford Dagenham plant comes to DVD. This entertaining and inspiring film charts the battle of the Ford workers who brought the car manufacturer to a standstill.

Despite a bit of artistic license, Made in Dagenham is a powerful film for all those seeking ideas on how to beat the bosses today.


Fair Game
Film, out 4 March

Based on the memoir by Valerie Plame, Fair Game tells the story of Plame's outing as a CIA agent by the US state following her husband's criticism of the Bush administration's rationale for the Iraq War.

This Hollywood thriller received rave reviews after its US release, so it could well be worth a look.