Five things to see or do this month

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“We Are the Lions”
19 October 2016-26 March 2017, Brent Museum and Archives, London
An exhibition commemorating the Grunwick Strike of 1976 to 1978. Forty years ago a group of workers led by Asian women stood up to their bosses and started one of the most important industrial disputes in British history, changing the face of the trade union movement in Britain. With photographs, testimonies, posters, banners and exclusive archive material.


10 Years of Akala
Album out now
MOBO award-winning hip hop artist and anti-racist activist Akala is on tour throughout October promoting his new album which is comprised of selected tracks chosen by his supporters. He has “an unquenchable appetite for intricate wordplay and an instinctive awareness of communicating heavy topics light-heartedly.”
HyperNormalisation
BBC iPlayer from 16 October
Acclaimed documentary maker Adam Curtis’s new film “tells the extraordinary story of how we got to this strange time of great uncertainty and confusion — where those who are supposed to be in power are paralysed — and have no idea what to do”. Along the way he links the Assad dynasty, Donald Trump, Henry Kissinger, the early performance artists in New York and President Putin. Some of his arguments socialist readers will not agree with, nevertheless it will be a fascinating journey.
Peter Kennard: Off Message
Until 27 November, Mac Birmingham
One of Britain’s most important political artists, Kennard’s distinctive photomontages have been used on posters, placards and banners by activist groups and organisations throughout the UK, particularly the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament. Off Message is a retrospective exhibition bringing together a collection of the artist’s work made between 1968 and 2016.
Let Them Eat Chaos
Out 7 October on CD and download
Poet, spoken-word artist and playwright Kate Tempest releases her second album this month. She will be touring Europe for the rest of the year, including Britain in December. The first track on the album, “Picture a Vacuum” is available on her website and conjures up an image of a half broken world spewing out the fire and steel of industrial destruction.