Alan Kenny

Zeitoun

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Dave Eggers, Hamish Hamilton, £18.99

The full horror of Hurricane Katrina, which hit New Orleans in 2005, feels like something distant - a whole ocean away, someone else's problem. Dave Eggers's brilliant new book brings us the sounds, sights and heartache of these dark days through the experience of Abdulrahman Zeitoun and his family.

Van Doesburg and the International Avant-Garde

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Tate Modern; Until 16 May

The transformative impact of the Russian Revolution on art has been the impetus for a series of excellent exhibitions at Tate Modern. Albers and Moholy-Nagy: From the Bauhaus to the New World (2006), Kandinsky: The Path to Abstraction (2006) and Rodchenko and Popova: Defining Constructivism (2009) all drew attention to the imaginative explosion that took place internationally in the wake of 1917, while not always telling us about the social processes that gave birth to such dynamic movements. This exhibition continues in this vein.

Children of the Sun

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Max Schaefer, Granta, £12.99

This brilliant first novel traces two interweaving narratives. There is the story of James, a gay journalist who becomes obsessed with the history of gays in the British fascist movement in the 1970s and 1980s. We also follow the story of Tony, a young gay man who becomes involved with the Nazis in the early 1970s.

Global Political Economy - A Marxist Critique

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Bill Dunn, Pluto Press, £19.99

As the ideological grip of neoliberalism unravels in the midst of the current economic crisis, this book paints a picture of the dynamism and chaos of the capitalist system and traces its twists and turns over the last century.

Part one deals with competing theories of political economy. Bill Dunn explains that, as Britain became the richest country on the back of the political revolutions of the 17th century and the establishment of a parliament, classical political economy developed in relation to deep political and social upheavals.

The Wave

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Director: Dennis Gansel; Release date: 19 September

High school teachers often make a lasting impression. No student of this film's central character - Rainer Wenger - could forget him in a hurry. Based on a true story from a Californian high school in 1967, the teacher attempts to explain the meaning of "autocracy" to his class during project week by teaching in an authoritarian manner.

Rainer is a popular lefty teacher who, sporting a different punk band T-shirt for every day of the week, strives to break with the stuffy teaching methods of some of his colleagues.

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