Christophe Chataigné

Humanitarian Imperialism

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Jean Bricmont, Monthly Review Press, £12.99

Surprisingly, Jean Bricmont, the author of Humanitarian Imperialism: Using Human Rights to Sell War, is a professor of theoretical physics. He became politically active in 1999 when Nato bombed former Yugoslavia. Bricmont was surprised by the lack of opposition to Nato's aggression, especially from the left.

His book is an attack on this left which has fallen for the argument of going to war for human rights. Bricmont looks at and deconstructs the use of "humanitarian interventionism" by the leading powers since the Cold War.

Ghosts of Cite Soleil

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Director: Asger Leth, Release date: 20 July

Ghosts of Cité Soleil is a documentary about two brothers, Bily and Haitian 2pac, who are leaders of the gang known as the Chimères (ghosts). They are two of five gang leaders who control heavily armed young people in Cité Soleill, the poorest slum of Port-au-Prince, the capital of the poorest country of the Western hemisphere, Haiti.

No more than cogs

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"It went from a philosophy of 'we like people, we use objects' to 'we use people, we like objects'." So said Pierre Nicolas of the CGT trade union after three workers from Renault's giant "Technocentre" committed suicide in four months.

One study concluded that work related issues are responsible for one suicide every day in France. Using Orwellian terms like "hyper-rationalisation", neoliberal policies have put French workers under ever greater pressure to reach targets and work longer hours. When Sodexho worker Isabelle Beal killed herself her last words were, "I'm not strong enough - too much pressure at work."

France's new president will not change this. Only the workers and students who successfully challenged the change to labour laws last year have the power to stop these neoliberal murders.

Money for Nothing

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Review of 'The Child', directors: Jean-Pierre Dardenne and Luc Dardenne

The Child is, after Rosetta in 1999, the second film by the Belgian Dardenne brothers to have won the Cannes Festival Palme D'Or. Whether or not winning this prize is a sign of quality, it is definitely a sign of the revival of European cinema. In the last few years it seems that films which makes you think have come back - the films of Lars von Trier, The Beat That My Heart Skipped by Jacques Audiard or more recently the gripping Hidden by Michael Haneke.

Breaking with Convention

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Review of 'Torture and Truth', Mark Danner, Granta £16.99

The detention camps at Guantanamo Bay and Absu Ghraib have become the symbols of what the US administration meant when it declared it was time to 'take the gloves off'. The aftermath of 11 September 2001 was the moment when a new term arrived on the scene: George W Bush was now fighting a new kind of war, the 'global war on terror' (or 'Gwot' as it is known in the corridors of power).

Remembrance of Things Past

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Review of '2046', director Wong Kar Wai

A stylish and nostalgic piece, 2046 follows the aesthetics and themes of In the Mood for Love. We find Chow Mo Wan (played by Tony Leung) a few years after his platonic affair with Su Li-zhen (Maggie Cheung). At the end of In the Mood for Love Chow was sad and heartbroken. Now he is writing pulp fiction and lives the life of a playboy in the 1960s with no commitments and many one-night stands.

Beware Epics Bearing Pitts

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Review of 'Troy', director Wolfgang Petersen

The successes of Braveheart, Gladiator and The Lord of the Rings trilogy brought back the epic film and made it commercially viable. Troy, the latest epic, will not be an exception. Inspired by Homer's Iliad and The Odyssey as well as Virgil's Aeneid, director Wolfgang Petersen transforms the ten-year saga into a 163-minute movie.

Holy Moses!

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Review of 'A Short Film about Killing' and 'A Short Film about Love', director Krzysztof Kieslowski

These films are extended theatrical versions of, respectively, 'Dekalog 5' and 'Dekalog 6'. Dekalog - ten one-hour television films loosely based on the ten commandments - was made in 1988, and with it Kieslowski's work started to be seen and recognised outside his native Poland.

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