Emma Davis

Going beyond gun control

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Simon Guy’s article, “We don’t want your thoughts and prayers” (April SR), looks at the huge movement in the US for action over gun control. The protests have been progressive and mainly led by young people. They have been a cry of rage against the Trump administration and the NRA.

But in order to tackle the gun violence in the US we have to go beyond the demand for tighter gun control, and look at the conditions which drive young people to commit such horrifying atrocities.

'Women could feel their power'

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

The Russian Revolution brought huge transformations for some of the most oppressed. Socialist Review spoke to Emma Davis about how women began to take control of their lives and lead in the struggle.

What was life like for women in Russia before the revolution?

Peasant women and women workers had virtually no rights in Tsarist Russia. They couldn’t get divorced; they had extremely limited property rights. It was only middle class women who could even consider leaving their husbands.

The beating of women by their husbands and fathers was actively encouraged — the more your husband beat you the more he was said to love you. It was customary for the father of the husband to have sex with his daughter in law.

Elle

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Elle is impeccably filmed and edited with stellar acting performances that grasp the attention of the audience. It intends to shock, infuriate and rile up the viewer.

However, it must come with a warning: this film could act as a serious trigger for anyone who has experienced domestic abuse or rape and as an insult to those of us who actively fight against women’s oppression.

Abortion Wars

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Abortion Wars is a fantastic analysis of past and present-day debates and fights for abortion rights — but it is also a tool for organisation and resistance.

Judith Orr describes the period we are living in as “a choice moment”, shaped by the clash between huge threats from Donald Trump and the anti-choice movement on the one hand and the growth of movements for women’s rights, like the women’s marches in January 2017 and abortion rights movements in Ireland and Poland.

Superwoman: Work, Build and Don't Whine

Issue section: 
Author: 

This exhibition documents women in Russian art and society from the great advances of the 1917 revolutions through to Perestroika in the 1980s. It identifies the double burden of oppression which women experienced in Stalinist Russia: exploited in the workplace and bearing the brunt of household chores and child rearing, all under the banner of being “liberated women”.

Any Day Now

Issue section: 
Author: 

Although Any Day Now takes place in Brooklyn in the 1970s, the issues of LGBT and disabled people's oppression that it raises are as relevant today as they were then. On the back of the LGBT movement of the late 1960s, the film grapples with the contradictions of a society torn between the bigotry of the past and new movements for liberation.

Classic read: The Jungle

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Upton Sinclair

In 1906, when Upton Sinclair was writing The Jungle, around 35,000 workers died every year in industry-related incidents in the US. It was in this context that Sinclair wrote this tale about the conditions of workers in the stockyards and meat packing plants of Chicago. Many will associate this novel with its shocking exposé of the unsanitary conditions in the meat packing plants, which contributed to the passing of the 1906 Meat Inspection Act. The description of meat being mixed with bone, blood, hair and flies, all in sweltering hot, bloody rooms, caused public outcry.

The Noise of Cairo

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Director Heiko Lange

The 18 days that shook the world and brought the Mubarak regime tumbling to its knees brought a fresh wave of expression and creativity to Egypt.

The experiences of ordinary people, after 30 years of dictatorship, working together to change society had a huge impact on art in Egypt. Director Heiko Lange explores the explosions of creativity during and after those 18 days through a series of interviews with independent artists.

Could there be an international revolution?

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Emma Davies argues that international revolution is possible - and essential if we are to overthrow capitalism

The past few years have shown the increasingly interconnected nature of the world we live in. We've seen the knock-on effects one event can have internationally - whether it's the financial crisis or the wave of dissent that has spread across the Arab world and beyond. Capitalism is truly global in nature. Any revolution that seeks to put an end to capitalism would have to spread internationally. Could this ever happen?

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Emma Davis