Judy Cox

Rebellious Daughters: Mother Jones & Bhikaiji Rustom Cama

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

In the second of our monthly series we celebrate the lives of union organiser Mother Jones and India independence leader Bhikaiji Rustom Cama

Mary "Mother" Jones (1837-1933) was born Mary Harris in 1837 in County Cork, Ireland. Her father Robert fled to Canada after taking part in a revolt against the landowners.

Mary became a schoolteacher but was barred from most schools because she was a Catholic. She later moved to Chicago and worked as a dressmaker.

She met George Jones, an iron worker and union organiser, in 1861 and they married and had four children. Sadly George and the four children died in a yellow fever epidemic in Memphis in Autumn 1867.

Sojourner Truth & Elisabeth Dmitrieff - Rebellious Daughters #1

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

We begin a monthly celebration of some of the most dynamic, fighting women from history.

Sojourner Truth (1797-1883) was born a slave in New York and named Isabella Baumfree. She was bought and sold four times and subjected to harsh physical labour and violent punishments. In her teens, she was united with another slave with whom she had five children.

Between 1826-27 Truth ran away with her infant Sophia to a nearby abolitionist family. The family bought her freedom for $20 and helped Truth successfully sue for the return of her five-year-old-son Peter, who was illegally sold into slavery in Alabama. She was the first black woman to sue a white man.

Who the Hell is Karl Marx? And What Are His Theories All About?

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Do we need another book on Marx? Many recently published books deal with Marx’s approach to history, to economics, to ecology and to the family in innovative and exciting ways. Having read this book, the answer is a definite yes.

We need books that present Marx and his ideas to new readers, and which remind all readers of the depth of the tradition in which we stand and its capacity to explain and contest the challenges we face.

Andrew: parasite and pariah

Issue section: 
Author: 

The exposure of Prince Andrew as an unapologetic ally of sexual abuser Jeffrey Epstein should serve as a reminder that the royals and their establishment friends treat people as commodities, writes Judy Cox.

Prince Andrew’s spectacular fall from “playboy prince” to international pariah means that all his hideous, arrogant bullying has been exposed. Skeletons are being pulled daily from his stuffed closet.

Social reproduction theory

Issue section: 
Author: 

Social Reproduction Theory, edited by Tithi Bhattacharya, has much more to offer than Sue Caldwell suggests in her review (July/August SR).

The essays provide a serious and rigorous attempt to extend a fundamental Marxist concept, the role of labour in creating value, to areas of life which have been neglected by many Marxist theoreticians, centrally the role of unpaid domestic labour in the reproduction of labour power.

Blake's Jerusalem

Issue section: 
Author: 

Jerusalem, the song based on a poem by William Blake, is now the unofficial national anthem.

For Danny Boyle, on the left, Jerusalem created the opportunity to include industrial workers in the Olympic opening ceremony. For David Cameron, on the right, Jerusalem is an expression of distinctively English nationhood. For many ordinary people Jerusalem offers a welcome alternative to the depressing, jingoist dirge of God Save the Queen.

Jerusalem is open to many interpretations. William Blake was a complex character and his works can be difficult to read - but one thing Blake was not was a nationalist of any kind. He was a revolutionary.

Fresh Production

Issue section: 
Author: 

Review of "Marx's Das Kapital", Francis Wheen, Atlantic Books £9.99

Francis Wheen's "biography" of Karl Marx's Capital is amusing and provocative, fascinating and at times infuriating. It covers a lot of ground for a book of only 130 pages.

Wheen's central theme is that Capital should be read not merely as an economic treatise but as a great work of Victorian gothic with Marx as a "poet of the dialectic". This idea appears to have originated in some insights developed by the Marxist philosopher Marshall Berman who argued that Marx should be considered as one of the great tortured giants of the 19th century.

A Novel Detective

Issue section: 
Author: 

Review of 'An Easy Thing', Paco Ignacio Taibo II, Friction £7.99

An Easy Thing is the first book to be published by Friction, a new publishing enterprise launched by Respect MP George Galloway and his colleague Ron McKay. The aim of Friction is to bring to British audiences works of fiction and non-fiction from around the world which will appeal to radical and left wing audiences. At a packed launch in a restaurant on Brick Lane, George said that he hoped the Friction imprint will publish 'books that burn, books that cause controversy and get people talking'.

Independents' Day

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Judy Cox meets the others.

One sign of disillusion with the major parties is the growth of Respect. Another is the number of people standing as independent candidates. The most powerful example is the three high-profile anti-war campaigners challenging arch-warmongers in the general election. Rose Gentle and Reg Keys are backed by Military Families Against the War. Rose's son, Gordon, was killed in Iraq last summer. She is attracting wide support for her challenge to armed forces minister Adam Ingram in East Kilbride.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Judy Cox