Lindsey German

Going Backward

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Under neo-liberalism women are only 'liberated' as long as it means equal rights of exploitation and being commodities for the market.

Sometimes I feel I'm going back to the 1950s. There seems to be an endless parade of mostly women in the media telling us that we can't have it all, and that women who choose careers without giving due thought to how and when they will have children will regret it. You really wouldn't be surprised to see a young Doris Day pop up with advice on how to keep your man, or a new game show on how to beat your biological clock.

One Law for the Rich...

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'Tough on crime, tough on the causes of crime.' Really? What about the big criminals robbing people of millions and of a decent life?

Compare and contrast, as the exam papers say. A heist called the biggest robbery in Britain takes place where £50 million in notes is stolen from a depot. Days of headline news follow, including a dramatic incident where police shoot out the tyres of a car, the eventual recovery of some money and the detention of suspects.

Empire Day Reloaded?

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What Gordon Brown's 'British Day' chooses to celebrate will not be as important as what it chooses to hide.

My dad shared his birthday, 24 May, with Queen Victoria. It was designated Empire Day, and when he was a child in the 1920s and 1930s school children held parades and celebrations of the British Empire, on which famously at the time the sun never set. I was reminded of this with all the talk about a 'British Day' proposed by Gordon Brown, when one suggestion was that this could be a resurrected Empire Day.

The Challenge for the Anti-War Movement

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Recent events make it even more important for anti-war protesters to take to the streets, argues Lindsey German.

July 7 2005 will be remembered for the terrible bombings which killed more than 50 people on the London transport system. The date was not random. For while innocent people going to work were blown to pieces by four separate bombs, 400 miles away in Gleneagles the G8 leaders, led by Bush and Blair, were surrounded and protected by the highest levels of security, including 1,300 Metropolitan police.

Only the Beginning

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This year's general election was a disaster for Blair and saw a significant breakthrough for the left.

The 2005 general election will go down in history in several different ways. It marked a historically low vote for any ruling party. Labour picked up only 36 percent of the popular vote, the Tories lost on 33 percent and the LibDems rose only slightly to 23 percent. The turnout was slightly up on last time at 61 percent. It also marked the revival of the left electorally in Britain.

Election: Shaking Up Blair's Banana Republic

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Exclusive excerpts from Respect candidate for West Ham Lindsey German's campaign blog.

The First Post
8 April

So it's the election at last: 5 May 2005 has been in Tony Blair's diary for a very long time - all planned to go according to the wishes of the spin doctors, the campaign managers and the politicians themselves.

Obituary: A Miller's Tale

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Arthur Miller lit up the darkest days of the 20th century.

When I heard that Arthur Miller had died I felt a pang which I normally only feel for people I knew personally. I have known of his work since I was a teenager. My school play in 1967 was Death of a Salesman, generally recognised as Miller's masterpiece. And we knew that Miller's other most famous play, The Crucible, used its subject of the Salem witch trials in Massachusetts in the 1690s to attack that modern US witchhunt, the McCarthy hearings.

New Book: History in the Making

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Leading figures in the Stop the War Coalition Andrew Murray and Lindsey German have just written a compelling account of this unique movement. Here we print extracts from their book.

Introduction

This is not just another book about the Iraq war and its military, diplomatic and political history. Of those, there are plenty already. Instead, it is the story of a remarkable mass movement.

Mass movements appear to come from nowhere and they take a direction which is often unpredictable. They gather a momentum which sometimes appears unstoppable and they can change the face of politics for a generation.

A Home for the Cross

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Review of 'So Now Who Do We Vote For?', John Harris, Faber £7.99

The fact that this book is being published now is perhaps of more significance than the book itself. I say this with no criticism of the author who has written a short readable work which does exactly what it says on the cover. But the book is very much a product of nearly eight years of Labour government and of the bitter disappointments it has produced. In particular it speaks for a layer of Labour loyalists who find themselves in the remarkable situation of questioning an often lifelong commitment.

Interview: Going from Bad to Worse

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The coming few months are crucial ones for all those opposed to war and imperialism, as Lindsey German explains to Andrew Stone.

What do you think we can expect from the elections in Iraq at the end of the month?

Nothing will fundamentally change as a result of the elections. If they go ahead - and it looks like they will - very large parts of the country will be effectively excluded. Sunnis in particular feel very disaffected and want to boycott. There are many other parties who've also called to delay the elections. And most of the people who want to go ahead are doing so because they feel that this will then put them in a position to tell the Americans to leave.

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