Martin Upchurch

Revolt in Bosnia

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Twenty years ago Bosnia was at the bloody heart of the Yugoslav civil wars. The war ended when the country was divided along "ethnic" lines by the Dayton Accord, leaving two eparate entities and one mixed "district".

Bosnia has since become a plaything of the West, with the US and the EU acting with the IMF and World Bank to impose austerity in return for increased and unsustainable levels of debt repayments.

Losing control of work

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An examination of the contemporary British workplace reveals that all is not well. Workers tell a story of increasing pressure to meet targets, longer working hours and constant surveillance. Performance targets set by managers are becoming ever less attainable, with bullying and harassment becoming the norm. A recent survey by Unison found that one third of employees have been bullied at work, double the figure in 2001.

Remembering the Bristol bus boycott

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Fifty years ago this month a few committed activists from Bristol's 3,000-strong black community launched a remarkable and ultimately successful campaign. As in the rest of post-war Britain, housing was difficult to find. A "colour bar" existed in many places with signs in windows proclaiming "No Blacks or Irish". Young black men on a night out would run the gauntlet of "Teddy boys".

White women who befriended black men would often be shunned by their white friends, and even be labelled as prostitutes. The depth of this racism was a product of Britain's imperial past, whereby black and Asian people would be considered as uncivilised children, and portrayed as near savages in general public discourse. As in some other cities, such as Coventry and West Bromwich, the colour bar in Bristol extended to employment on the buses.

The Invisible Handcuffs of Capitalism

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Michael Perelman

Michael Perelman is a dissident among academic economists, who engages with Marxist analysis through the US based journal Monthly Review. His books aim at tempting American audiences into discovering aspects of Marxist analysis through a popular writing style.

This latest book focuses on the degradation of workers in the US today. The starting point of his analysis is the decline of real wages in the US since the end of the 1970s. This, argues Perelman, "has not radicalised workers, but rather just made them more fearful of losing their jobs".

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