Peter Dwyer

Capitalism and Sport

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Over the summer most of us will have been unable to ignore the tennis at Wimbledon, the IAAF athletics World Championships in Moscow and the start of the football season in August. During this period tens of millions of people will have tuned in to the media to share in the agony and ecstasy that accompany all sport.

Whether you like it or not, either participating, watching or both, sport plays an incredibly important role in society today. In reading this fascinating book, I could not but help recognise its link to my own experiences.

Eurozone on the brink of collapse?

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The global economy is entering "a dangerous new phase", said the International Monetary Fund before its annual meeting last month. The same can be said for the European Union (EU) and the eurozone.

At the centre of all the press talk of a capitalist crisis (and this is the phrase increasingly used by papers such as the Financial Times) lies a crisis of the eurozone - the EU economy is bigger than that of the US.

South Africa Pushed to the Limit

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Hein Marais


Imagine thousands of key activists steeped in the traditions of mass struggle and revolution catapulted into government. Imagine leading officials in the judiciary calling themselves revolutionaries and trade union leaders running government ministries. This has been South Africa under the African National Congress (ANC) government since 1994. Hein Marais's latest book on what became of the South African revolution provides some detailed lessons for those in the midst of revolution today.

The Bases of Empire

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Catherine Lutz, Pluto Press; £17.99

This book details how military bases, the springboard for US militarism, have changed continuously throughout history in relation to the needs of imperialism and the resistance to it.

It shows how in Latin America the US is using the "war on terror" as a subtext for new ways to get a foothold in key strategic areas such as the tri-border area of Paraguay, Argentina and Brazil. This is an important economic area and close to the Bolivian gas reserves at the centre of the class struggle unfolding there.

Explaining a World of Extremes

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Review of 'World Development: An Introduction', eds. Prodromos Panayitopoulos and Gavin Capps, Pluto £16.99

In 1999 World Bank president James Wolfensohn admitted, 'At the level of people, the system isn't working.' This book will help you understand why. Introducing students, teachers and NGO workers to debates about the relationship between state, industrialisation and Third World development, it makes it clear that capitalism is a highly uneven system, creating winners and losers.

Good introductory academic books, such as this, used to be standard in development studies. Hopefully students will read this one before they are fed the routine sycophantic books found on courses today.

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