Phil Whaite

Rules of Engagement

Issue section: 
Author: 

Review of 'Ae Fond Kiss', director Ken Loach

Ken Loach and screenwriter Paul Laverty's new film, Ae Fond Kiss, opens with a young Muslim woman, Tahara, doing a presentation to her school class. She talks about the increase in Islamophobia since 9/11 and brilliantly challenges the idea that all Muslims are the same. She talks about the many contradictions she faces in her own life and how they affect her. It's a good introduction to the film, as we see how a Muslim family in Glasgow, whose parents emigrated from Pakistan, deal with their own contradictions and problems.

This Charming Man: An Interview with Pete Doherty

Issue section: 
Issue: 

Phil Whaite spoke to Pete Doherty of The Libertines after a Love Music Hate Racism gig that filled the London Astoria.

Why did you feel it was important to do this gig?

There's a point you reach before you're perverted and tainted by all the things that drag you into the music business, like avarice or a lust for fame. The original reason why I started was some feeling of community, equality, wanting to fight for things you believe in. Any kid who's gone to a state school knows what it's all about - bullying, racism. And you've just got to make a stand.

Black and White

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Review of ’The War is Dead, Long Live the War‘ by Patrick Jones, Touring

Walking into the theatre at London‘s ICA, the first thing you could see was the stall covered with Stop the War Coalition leaflets for the demonstration on 27 September. Then, looking at the play‘s programme, there was a full-page advert for the demo, and a list of useful websites which included www.socialistreview.org.uk. Before the play started, a speaker from the Stop the War Coalition gave a brief speech about the horrors of the occupation in Iraq, and called for people in the audience to come on the demo and bring their friends.

Man about the House

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Review of 'Pure', director Gillies Mackinnon

Gillies Mackinnon's new film 'Pure' opens with a ten year old boy, Paul, preparing a fix of heroin. He puts it on a tray with flowers and cigarettes, and takes it upstairs to his mother as 'breakfast in bed'. Paul thinks that all he is doing is helping his mum with her 'medicine'. She is sick--so sick she has forgotten it is his birthday. This scene sets the tone for the rest of the film, in which Paul's mother Mel's drug addiction is seen through his eyes.

Subscribe to RSS - Phil Whaite