Saba Shiraz

AIM

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MIA’s fifth album is fresh, vibrant and bold, encapsulating everything that is unique about her as an artist. Her songs are infused with politics and are as relevant as ever.

Throughout the album there is a consistent theme of opening borders and explicit references to the ongoing refugee crisis that has yet to be resolved in Europe and across the world.

MIA has been criticised for her writing but any fan knows that lazy lyrics are part of her style. She aims to be simple, to the point and in your face.

Agenda of fear

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David Cameron targets Muslims

Socialists and anti-racists must counter the Tories' Prevent strategy and the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act.

In 2005 Tony Blair’s New Labour government launched a counter-terrorism strategy called Contest. This was set up after the London bombings of July 2005 and Prevent was a key part of it. Contest was widely criticised as being Islamophobic and fuelling suspicion towards Muslim communities. This was the same government that had led us into a bloody war in Iraq, costing the lives of millions of innocent Iraqi people. Innocent people in Britain also suffered the consequences of the government’s war when it made us a target in the London bombings.

He Named Me Malala

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If anybody should have a film made about them, it should be Malala Yousafzai. Still only seventeen years old, she has a huge story to tell — she survived a bullet to her head, she is the youngest ever Nobel prize laureate and she stood up to the most dangerous force in her home town — the Taliban.

He Named Me Malala is a touching film which really shows what a strong, confident and intelligent young woman Malala is and why she has inspired so many other girls and women, young and old, to challenge the status quo and fight for better lives and more respect.

Amy

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This documentary will challenge everything anyone thought they knew about Amy Winehouse.

The tragic death of the English soul and jazz singer at the age of 27 in 2011 ended a talent that had brought us the five Grammy Award winning album Back to Black and powerful songs such as 2008’s “Rehab”.

Director Asif Kapadia, who also made the critically acclaimed documentary Senna, has pieced together some of the best memories of the singer, smashing the disgusting judgements that the mainstream media made about her during her lifetime.

Girlhood

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Sciamma’s Girlhood (following Tomboy and Water Lilies) is an unforgettable piece of cinema, gripping from start to finish. The story gives an honest portrayal of the lives of young, working class, black women growing up in a deprived area of France. The film focuses on the struggle of 16 year old protagonist Marieme (Karidja Touré) after she is refused the opportunity to progress into further education. She lives on an estate in a neighbourhood dominated by men.

East is East

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East is East is a priceless modern classic about the tensions among conflicting cultures in multiracial Britain.

Pakistani chip-shop owner George Khan (played by the author Ayub Khan Din) wants his children to remember and abide by their Pakistani roots.

He makes every effort to bring them up in a strict Muslim household, despite the fact that his family were born and raised in 1970s Salford.

Gone Too Far!

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Gone Too Far

Adapted from Bola Agbaje’s Olivier award winning play, Gone Too Far! is a hilarious and shrewdly observed comedy with a storyline you can relate to and truthfully depicted characters.

The film is set in vibrant and culturally diverse Peckham, south London. The plot follows young teenager Yemi, born and brought up in Britain and obsessed with his street cred, and his estranged brother Iku, an excitable and proud Nigerian who is new to London.

Films: Belle

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Inspired by true events, the film Belle follows the case of a young mixed race woman named Dido Elizabeth Belle, who is raised by an aristocratic family in 18th century England.

She was the illegitimate daughter of Admiral Sir John Lindsay and an enslaved African woman. Dido is raised by her aunt and her uncle, Lord Mansfield who was Lord Chief Justice at the time.

Film After Film

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In his explosive and thought-provoking new volume Film After Film: Or, What became of 21st Century Cinema? James Hoberman argues that the world of making movies has undergone a ground-breaking transformation.

His vast and versatile collection of reviews and essays, written mainly for New York's The Village Voice, affirm Hoberman's reputation as one of the most shrewd and politically sharp commentators on film.

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