Tim Sanders

Red Rosa

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This is a really good book and I’d recommend it to anyone new to the ideas of the great Marxist thinker and activist of the German Revolution, Rosa Luxemburg, or, indeed, new to the genre of the graphic novel — it is a great introduction to both.

This is a novelised biography and largely sticks to the reality of her life, with one or two alterations for literary effect.

The story begins with Luxemburg’s birth to a struggling but educated Jewish family in Zamosc, Poland, then a part of the Russian Empire.

Satire should spear the powerful

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The savage killing of the Charlie Hebdo cartoonists and journalists by terrorists in Paris is utterly contemptible, but not inexplicable. For me as a cartoonist this seemed to be horribly close to home. As the great cartoonist Joe Sacco commented immediately after the massacre, “This is my tribe”. Sadly, the ensuing media storm has done little to explain and a lot to foment division and put the blame upon “backward” Islam and Muslims in general.

Joe Sacco: A long drawn out conflict

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Joe Sacco talks to Tim Sanders and Patrick Ward about how he got into comic journalism and the power of cartoons

Why did you decide to make your new book, Footnotes in Gaza?

I went to the Gaza Strip with Chris Hedges, an American journalist for Harper's magazine. He was writing and I was illustrating. This was at the beginning of the second Intifada. We decided that we would focus on one town in Gaza, Khan Yunis.

On the Wrong Side

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Review of 'Lobo', director Miguel Courtois

Dennis Donaldson, British agent in the Irish Republican movement, died at the hands of an unknown assassin. His death highlighted the strange loneliness of long-term spies who spend years or decades undermining the cause which they claim they are prepared to die for. It is a situation which has been well examined in film and literature when the action takes place at the international level, and the struggle is between states.

Shooting the Present

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Review of "Tina Modotti and Edward Weston: The Mexico Years", Barbican, until 1 August

In the 1920s European art was in the middle of a revolution which would end in what is now known as modernism. Yet in another part of the world an equally significant though less well documented artistic revolution was taking place. The Mexican Revolution in the early 1900s became a beacon of hope to millions of poor people across Latin America, and a noble cause to many on the left, especially in the US.

The Great Walls of Mexico

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Review of 'Jose Clemente Orozco in the United States', eds. Renato Gonzáles Mello and Diane Miliotes, WW Norton £40.00

The Mexican Revolution, whatever else may be said about it, succeeded in producing an astonishingly rich visual art. This was the political mural, a unique form of expression, particular to the time and place of the Mexican Revolution. The three most famous and successful practitioners of this art form were Diego Rivera, David Alfaro Siqueiros and Jose Clemente Orozco.

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