Art / Exhibitions

The Art of Persuasion: Wartime posters by Abram Games

Issue section: 
Author: 

The Art of Persuasion at the National Army Museum is a fascinating exhibition of Second World War posters produced by the incredibly prolific and inventive artist Abram Games (although artist is not a term he liked to use about himself. He preferred the term “graphic thinker”). It’s also an insight into how the Second World War was seen by very many of its ordinary participants, military and civilian.

Get Up, Stand Up Now

Issue section: 
Author: 

Somerset House is celebrating the past 50 years of Black creatives in Britain through its new exhibit Get Up, Stand Up Now. The exhibit provides snapshots into the Black British experience. It is designed to shift the perspective of British history through the lens of Black art and expression.

Each room contains a variety of creative media: music, dance, photography, film and more. It highlights the way in which Black Britons have and continue to carve space in British society.

Paula Rego: Obedience and Defiance

Issue section: 
Author: 

The title of this exhibition, which spans Portuguese artist Paula Rego’s output from the 1960s to the present day, succinctly describes the tensions expressed in her complex work. Rego’s experience and imagination are particular to Portuguese society —starting with growing up under Salazar’s savage fascist dictatorship and the weight of the Catholic Church. But her works go beyond the particular to comment on the human experience — particularly women’s — in all oppressive, hierarchical societies.

A powerful record of resilience

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Spent teargas canisters. Hundreds of these dull grey tubes the size of deodorant cans littered the sand on the walk to the contaminated former landfill site in Calais that became a temporary camp for as many as 10,000 displaced people until late 2016. This was the place called Lande or “heath” by the French authorities, but alternatively “The Jungle” by its oppressed inhabitants.

Mary Quant

Issue section: 
Issue: 

For their latest exhibition, the V&A invites the viewer to “discover how Mary Quant launched a fashion revolution on the British high street”. The R-word features heavily throughout, used to describe everything from her use of coloured tights to a prescient view of the sweeping social change which characterised the 1960s.

The German Revolution: Expressionist prints

Issue section: 
Issue: 

Marking the centenary of the 1918-19 revolution in Germany, Glasgow’s Hunterian gallery has on display an impressive and wide-ranging selection of etchings, lithographs and woodcuts from the wave of printmaking in Germany during the first two decades of the 20th century, as well as works representing key influences on this movement.

Corita Kent: Power Up

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

The cultural explosions that took place amid the social and political upheavals of 1960s America threw up extraordinary new forms of expression that articulated incendiary challenges to state injustices and atrocities of that postwar era.

Corita Kent was a radical artist, activist, designer and art educator whose exuberant, subversive and at times controversial work revolutionised typographical design and cried out against injustice. Corita seized pop art by the throat and set it to work for human liberation.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Art / Exhibitions