Art / Exhibitions

Banksy versus Bristol Museum

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City Museum & Art Gallery, Bristol, until 31 August

Banksy has come home to Bristol. The anonymous street artist launched his biggest ever exhibition at the city's museum at the end of June, provoking Banksy mania in the local and national press.

Banksy versus Bristol Museum brings together more than 100 pieces of work, many of which are brand new. The exhibition was conceived, planned and set up by Banksy's crew and the head of the museum without the knowledge of Bristol City Council, which owns the place, once again demonstrating Banksy's chutzpah.

Maggie! Maggie! Maggie!

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The Cartoon Museum, London

On 6 May the Cartoon Museum marks the 30th anniversary of Margaret Thatcher's election as prime minister with the exhibition Maggie! Maggie! Maggie! The pictures have been selected by Guardian cartoonist Steve Bell and former Tory minister Kenneth Baker and reveal how she has been both loved and loathed by the British public. Steve Bell explains:

New Lanark

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South Lanarkshire, Scotland

Readers of Socialist Review may like to know, if they did not already, that 2008 is the 150th anniversary of the death of Robert Owen. In Engels' Socialism, Utopian and Scientific the term "Utopian Socialists" was coined for the group that included Owen and made first attempts to formulate a vision of what a socialist society might be like.

Francis Bacon

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Tate Britain

Reviewing an exhibition is an invitation to comment both on the exhibition as such and on the art presented. Since performing both tasks satisfactorily is impossible in the space available I shall concentrate on questions raised by Francis Bacon's work and say only this about the exhibition.

Frolic

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Huang Yong Ping, Barbican, London until 21 September

Huang Yong Ping's Frolic is a tale about the largest drug traffickers of the 19th century: the British Empire.

Frolic was a New England clipper ship built for the opium trade in Asia. For Huang, however, it isn't only the name of the ship. It is about capitalism and its wars.

The Lure of the East

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Tate Britain, London, Until 31 August

British contacts with the Muslim world go back a long way. The first Moroccan ambassador, for example, visited London in 1600 as part of an alliance with England against Spain. While here he had his portrait painted, and the intervening 400 years have seen a complicated network of connections develop between politics and culture.

Citizen Milton

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Bodleian Library, Oxford, until 26 April

Oxford University owe John Milton. Milton was a revolutionary republican and, after the restoration of the monarchy in 1660, the University Convocation, with the typical bravery of academic institutions, voted to burn his books. Twice.

Luckily, somewhere in the darkened shelves of the Bodleian, the librarians hid away Milton's works and they survived to be exhibited here. Now the danger is long past, they've done him proud.

Duchamp, Man Ray, Picabia

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Tate Modern, London, until 26 May

Just before the First World War the cultural world was rocked by a series of dissident artists. They were self-conscious rebels out to shock. They fought convention on many fronts. They used new non-art materials, selected new subject matter, scrapped the conventions of naturalism like perspective, depth and realistic colour, and in general tried to break down the boundaries between art and everyday life.

They have become known as modernists, and the three featured in this exhibition were among the most controversial.

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