Art / Exhibitions

What I Believe

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Space, Hackney, until 19 December

Ruth Beale's project is to stage an exhibition of political and literary pamphlets dating from the 1930s until today with some paintings based on them.

It is not just something to look at, although all the pamphlets can be picked up and read. It is a piece of political art designed to provoke discussion on the history of the political intervention that a pamphlet represented and represents, and whether this is still relevant in the internet age.

Ms Understood: Women's Liberation in 1970s Britain

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Women's Library, London Metropolitan University

This exhibition celebrating 40 years of the Women's Liberation Movement is showing at the Women's Library in Whitechapel, London.

There is a short description of life for women before the 1960s which touches on the Suffragettes. But after this we are hurled into an exciting display of posters, photos and video clips of the demos and pickets which set off in 1970 with a conference at Ruskin College, Oxford. 300 women were expected at the conference, but double that number turned up, with the men running the creche.

Banksy versus Bristol Museum

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City Museum & Art Gallery, Bristol, until 31 August

Banksy has come home to Bristol. The anonymous street artist launched his biggest ever exhibition at the city's museum at the end of June, provoking Banksy mania in the local and national press.

Banksy versus Bristol Museum brings together more than 100 pieces of work, many of which are brand new. The exhibition was conceived, planned and set up by Banksy's crew and the head of the museum without the knowledge of Bristol City Council, which owns the place, once again demonstrating Banksy's chutzpah.

Maggie! Maggie! Maggie!

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The Cartoon Museum, London

On 6 May the Cartoon Museum marks the 30th anniversary of Margaret Thatcher's election as prime minister with the exhibition Maggie! Maggie! Maggie! The pictures have been selected by Guardian cartoonist Steve Bell and former Tory minister Kenneth Baker and reveal how she has been both loved and loathed by the British public. Steve Bell explains:

New Lanark

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South Lanarkshire, Scotland

Readers of Socialist Review may like to know, if they did not already, that 2008 is the 150th anniversary of the death of Robert Owen. In Engels' Socialism, Utopian and Scientific the term "Utopian Socialists" was coined for the group that included Owen and made first attempts to formulate a vision of what a socialist society might be like.

Francis Bacon

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Tate Britain

Reviewing an exhibition is an invitation to comment both on the exhibition as such and on the art presented. Since performing both tasks satisfactorily is impossible in the space available I shall concentrate on questions raised by Francis Bacon's work and say only this about the exhibition.

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