Art / Exhibitions

Changing Dialogue

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Tanya Barson looks at the rich history of art and documentary in Britain from 1929 to now.

The 1930s and 1940s can be viewed as the era in which documentary was first defined and given recognition as an independent area of production. Central to this was the film movement of the 1930s, led by the producer and film-maker John Grierson, who had coined the term 'documentary'.

Grierson defined documentary as 'the creative use of actuality'. He was influenced by modernist film practice, yet attempted to reintroduce social commentary into avant garde film.

Turn on the Light

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Review of Dan Flavin, Hayward Gallery, London

At first Dan Flavin's art feels like pure pleasure. Flavin became famous in the 1960s by working almost exclusively with fluorescent light tubes of various colours. It is extraordinary how his careful positioning of these fingers of light transforms spaces and influences moods.

People wandering about this exhibition look genuinely exhilarated. I can't remember ever seeing children so transfixed at an exhibition - they explore the magically lit spaces with wonder in their eyes.

Disorienting Art

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Review of Observations, Christopher Stewart, Open Eye Gallery, Liverpool

Who watches the watchers? How mundane can a place of violence be? What does a politic of fear, in a war without end, look like?

These are the kinds of questions that are posed by Christopher Stewart's work. In his previous exhibition, Insecurity, were photographs of fleeting and nervous figures who were engaged in security practices which became their opposite, and where even the assassins appeared beatific while sleeping.

Back to the Future

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Sue Jones looks at the visionary art of Henri Rousseau.

Henri Rousseau (1844-1910) created some of the most instantly recognisable and best loved paintings of the modern era. He is most famous for his lush, dreamlike jungle paintings, many of which feature in this huge collection, the first exhibition of Rousseau's work in this country for over 80 years.

Rousseau was born into a petty bourgeois family in a small French market town. He served in the army and then found employment as a minor civil servant. He lived most of his life in poverty, outliving two wives and seeing six of his seven children die in infancy.

Edvard Munch

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Preview of Edvard Munch by Himself, Royal Academy of Arts, London

Edvard Munch (1863-1944), the Norwegian artist, is regarded as one of the 20th century's greatest painters. Edvard Munch by Himself opens at the Royal Academy of Arts in October and runs until December. It focuses on the artist's lesser-known self-portraits and will be the first time that such a large cross-section, from all stages of his career, has been brought together. Starting with the first self-portrait painted as a 17 year old student at the Royal School of Drawing, 'Kristiania', the exhibition concludes with the last works produced in Ekely in the 1940s.

Flower Power

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Review of 'Summer of Love - Art of the Psychedelic Era', Liverpool Tate

Summer of Love is, to quote the press release, 'a ground-breaking exhibition to reveal the unprecedented exchanges between contemporary art, popular culture, civil unrest and moral upheaval during the 1960s and early 1970s.' The exhibition 'reconstructs the original creative and utopian potential of psychedelic art and locates it within the wider cultural and political context of the period'.

Frida Kahlo: a Life

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There is much power and beauty in the work of Frida Kahlo, says Mike Gonzalez, who examines the life of this remarkable artist.

There are two houses in almost neighbouring streets in the Mexico City district of Coyoacan. One is spare and dark and surrounded by high walls; there is very little colour to break the monotony and its gate is usually locked. This was the house where Leon Trotsky lived and was murdered in 1940.

Meet the Neighbours

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Review of 'Küba' by Kutlug Ataman, The Sorting Office, London

With Küba, Kutlug Ataman has filmed a misrepresented or unrepresented group of people, living on the edge of Istanbul in a place called Küba. He invited these people to tell their stories and he gave them plenty of time to do it. He spent more than two years collecting the stories of this marginalised and diverse 'community'.

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