Art / Exhibitions

Frida Kahlo: a Life

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There is much power and beauty in the work of Frida Kahlo, says Mike Gonzalez, who examines the life of this remarkable artist.

There are two houses in almost neighbouring streets in the Mexico City district of Coyoacan. One is spare and dark and surrounded by high walls; there is very little colour to break the monotony and its gate is usually locked. This was the house where Leon Trotsky lived and was murdered in 1940.

Meet the Neighbours

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Review of 'Küba' by Kutlug Ataman, The Sorting Office, London

With Küba, Kutlug Ataman has filmed a misrepresented or unrepresented group of people, living on the edge of Istanbul in a place called Küba. He invited these people to tell their stories and he gave them plenty of time to do it. He spent more than two years collecting the stories of this marginalised and diverse 'community'.

The Pivot of New Traditions

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Review of 'Turks: A Journey of a Thousand Years, 600-1600', Royal Academy of Arts, London, 22 January-12 April

Despite there being over a billion practising Muslims across the globe and despite the vast array of Islamic art and architecture (Abbasid, Moorish and Mughal, to name just a few), the Royal Academy of Arts has not produced a largely Islamic exhibition since 1931. With this subject matter now being so topical it was only a matter of time before it followed the likes of the Courtauld and V&A in staging its very own Muslim blockbuster.

An African Anthology

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Review of 'Africa Remix', Hayward Gallery, London until 17 April

While Tony Blair vies with Gordon Brown for the title of saviour of Africa, this exhibition shows us Africa as it really is. It is 'the largest exhibition of contemporary African art ever seen in Europe', the guide informs us, and 'rather than a comprehensive survey, the exhibition is an anthology'.

Incandescent Rage

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Review of 'Freedom Fries' by Steve Brodner, Fantagraphics $29.95 (available on-line for around £16)

The cartoons in this book cover American politics and politicians from Ronald Reagan to George W Bush, and none of them gets off lightly.

The pictures are mostly ink all over the place spitting bloody attacks on whoever he's drawing. There are also over-the-top caricatures. In the introduction he explains that the mainstream press didn't want to know about a lot of his cartoons - not much of a surprise.

Art Escapes the Gallery Walls

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Review of The 2004 Turner Prize, Tate Britain, London

The Turner Prize is a competition. It has a TV event to announce the result on 6 December, long before which bookmakers quote odds and the press declares its favourites with argument and passion.

But it is more than a media circus. It has a good history with quality past winners including Gillian Wearing, Damien Hirst and Anthony Gormley. The Turner Prize has made the 'installation' commonplace, has led film into the art gallery, and has turned the art world sharply towards social themes.

Caught in a Trap: A Tribute to Henri Cartier-Bresson

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Before the age of television, the work of photographers was often the only source of visual information to a public hungry for news. Henri Cartier-Bresson, who died recently at the age of 96, was part of the first generation of photojournalists.

Cartier-Bresson came from a wealthy French family, but he was always a radical left winger and rebel. This informed his photography and the emphasis that he placed on recording aspects of ordinary people's lives, setting the standards for, and being hugely influential on, future photojournalists.

Earth from the Air

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Review of photographs by Yann Arthus-Bertrand, Royal Botanic Gardens, Edinburgh, and Birmingham Victoria Square

Yann Arthus-Bertrand's photographic portrait of our planet, Earth from the Air, has been shown in 52 cities since its launch in 1999. This open air exhibition contains a range of stunning images from over 100 countries. Each image has a story to tell - most with ecological or social themes, which when viewed collectively present the ecosystem and our relationship to it in all its complicated glory.

Shooting the Present

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Review of "Tina Modotti and Edward Weston: The Mexico Years", Barbican, until 1 August

In the 1920s European art was in the middle of a revolution which would end in what is now known as modernism. Yet in another part of the world an equally significant though less well documented artistic revolution was taking place. The Mexican Revolution in the early 1900s became a beacon of hope to millions of poor people across Latin America, and a noble cause to many on the left, especially in the US.

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