Culture

Mouthwatering Perspectives

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Review of exhibition 'Matisse Picasso' at Tate Modern, London

This exhibition has been acclaimed as 'momentous' and 'tremendous' and 'the first major exhibition of the 21st century'. For once, it is an event that lives up to the hype. The masterpieces are worth the pricey £10 entrance fee by themselves. But seeing Matisse and Picasso's works placed next to each other, seeing how they learnt from and fed off each other across the decades, is a revelation.

Much to Console

Issue section: 
Issue: 

Review of exhibition 'Game On' at the Barbican, until 15 September and transfers to the Museum of Scotland, Edinburgh, in October

The 'Game On' exhibition, an exploration of the culture and history of videogames, is very timely. It comes at the start of a new wave of consolidation in the games console industry. Microsoft's X-Box and Nintendo's Game Cube have just been launched in Britain, where they will be pitched against Sony's PlayStation 2.

A Mix of Old and New

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Review of Manchester Art Gallery, Mosely Street, Manchester

The Manchester Art Gallery has recently re-opened after a £35 million refit. The neo-classical section has now been expanded to almost twice its original size. The gallery has a number of permanent exhibitions with themed 'stories' and displays which highlight how historic and contemporary art and design has been woven into the fabric of the city. Works by LS Lowry and Adolphe Valette are complemented alongside works by artists and designers working in the city today.

Fight or Flight

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Review of 'The Invincible', director Werner Herzog

Werner Herzog's 'The Invincible' is set in 1932 in a Polish stetl (Jewish village), and Berlin just before Hitler's victory. It tells the story of Zishe Breitbart (Jouka Ahola), the son of a Jewish blacksmith with phenomenal physical strength, who is lured to Berlin with the promise of fame and fortune. There he meets Hanussen (Tim Roth), 'king of the occult', who runs a cabaret specialising in the supernatural that is popular with Nazis and wealthy Berliners, at a time when the Nazi movement is on the edge of power.

Sex in the City

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Review of 'Sidewalks of New York', director Edward Burns

New York is the setting for this exploration of love, deceit, and the neuroses of six people in and out of various relationships. 'Sidewalks of New York' is an attempt to understand the interaction of the city with its inhabitants, and the impact of this on their lives and their relationships.

The Faultline Between Love and War

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Review of 'A Russian in the Woods' by Peter Whelan, Barbican, London

Peter Whelan's play deals with the human wreckage of war and imperialistic rivalry. Set in a devastated Berlin in 1949, this production focuses on Pat Harford, a young British soldier. He arrives in Germany shortly after superpower politics have changed direction. Stalin has metamorphosed into a totalitarian dictator intent on conquest, and the storm clouds of a new conflict gather.

A Block on the Past

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Review of 'Sorrows and Rejoicings' by Athol Fugard, Tricycle Theatre, London

Athol Fugard's 'Sorrows and Rejoicings' is an exploration of the life of a dissident poet.

Dawid, an anti-apartheid Afrikaaner intellectual, has died. His widow, Allison, and his black house servant, Marta, begin a compelling retrospective of his life. Allison, who returns to Karoo village for the funeral, may own the house, but she is unmistakably a stranger in what is Marta's home.

Divided Loyalties

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Review of 'A Masked Ball' by Giuseppe Verdi, English National Opera, London

The new production of Verdi's 'A Masked Ball' (1859) by Spanish director Calixto Bieito has unleashed a wave of media hysteria. Not only has Bieito transferred the setting from 18th century Sweden to post-Franco Spain, but he seems almost to have invited controversy--the opera opens with a row of 14 conspirators sitting on the toilet.

War and Peace

Issue section: 
Issue: 

Review of 'No Man's Land', director Danis Tanovic

Sometimes you see an image so often that it becomes familiar and meaningless, and the scenes of wars we see on television are one example. During the civil war that consumed Yugoslavia in the 1990s, a television reporter would talk to camera in front of armoured personnel carriers full of UN peacekeepers, the sound of shelling going on behind them. But it does not take much to make an apparently familiar situation seem new.

Pages