Editorial

Thrill on Capitol Hill

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

The neo-cons got more than they bargained for when they invited George Galloway to Capitol Hill last month.

More used to subservience from its visitors, instead it was the Senate committee and, by extension, the whole Bush administration which found itself on trial for the illegal war in Iraq. George Galloway has spoken for the millions throughout the world who have opposed one of the great crimes of modern times.

Doubters on the Doorstep

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

The war in Iraq, declare the pollsters and some press 'experts', is not an issue that registers high on the list of voters' concerns in the forthcoming election.

Much more immediate worries, they argue, are the domestic issues of the health service, pensions and education.

No one can doubt the importance of the state of public services in this election, bearing in mind how much they have deteriorated in eight years under New Labour. But however much the media would like to deny it - or, as in this election, ignore it - the issue of the Iraq war will simply not go away.

Toxic Lies

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

'The Al Qaida plot to poison Britain'. That was how the Times reported the raid on a north London flat in January 2003 that had supposedly revealed a massive conspiracy to use the toxic substance ricin to terrorise the country.

But the most dangerous plot, revived during this election campaign, has been to attack our civil liberties.

Within two days of the raid, David Blunkett, John Reid and Tony Blair had all made horrified statements. The discovery highlighted the perils of weapons of mass destruction, intoned Blair, and showed that 'this danger is present and real'.

Land and Freedom

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Michael Howard has again scoured the gutter by attacking travellers and Gypsies.

He has taken aim at families unable to get planning permission for encampments, and proposed a raft of draconian measures to aid their persecution. As home secretary in 1994 he drew up the notorious Criminal Justice and Public Order Act, removing the duty of local authorities to provide caravan sites. Gypsies and travellers were to be 'encouraged' to purchase land and legitimise their sites through the planning system. The act criminalised trespass and gave the police harsh powers of eviction.

Round One to Us

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

The right wing media and the three main political parties constantly tell us that the trade union movement is an anachronism - that working class people are powerless to organise against neoliberalism. But this was not the message sent out by the government's retreat over public sector pensions last month.

Tony Blair, faced with the prospect of two waves of strikes by over 2 million workers, ordered ministers to promise union leaders a 'fresh start' and negotiations just days before changes to the local government pension scheme were due to come into effect. The CBI bosses' federation criticised the government for 'backing down in the face of political pressure'.

Food to Die For

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

The promised panacea of processed supermarket food tastes more unpleasant than ever with the discovery that hundreds of products have been contaminated with a potentially cancer-causing dye.

Sudan 1 has been found in over 400 sauces, soups, salad dressings and other food products. All the big supermarkets, which control more than 70 percent of the grocery market in Britain, are affected.

The Battle Rages On

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Tens of thousands are set to gather in London on 19 March for the next big anti-war demonstration. The anti-war movement must now gear itself up for its next battle as Bush threatens to extend his 'war on terror' to Iran or Syria.

Barely satisfied with the destruction of Iraq, the possibility of a civil war in the country and the deaths of tens of thousands of its citizens, Bush has raised the prospect of extending the war even further. Part of the neo-conservative gameplan has always been to ensure strategic control over access to Middle Eastern oil, even if that means redrawing the boundaries of the region, building 14 permanent bases in Iraq and deposing leaders.

And the World Keeps Burning

Issue section: 

In early 2001 Exxon sent a memo to the White House. The world's biggest private oil and gas company requested that the chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change be 'replaced at the request of the US'.

The Bush administration obediently lobbied other countries in favour of a successor, Dr Rajendra Pachauri. Former US vice-president Al Gore dubbed Pachauri the 'let's drag our feet candidate'.

Last month Dr Pachauri belied these ignoble beginnings. He warned that global warming was nearing a point of no return, and called for immediate 'very deep cuts' in greenhouse gas emissions.

The Election Starts Here

Issue section: 
Author: 

Rarely can a prime minister have been so weak in the run-up to a general election as Tony Blair. Iraq runs like a festering sore right through the heart of New Labour.

With its credibility eroded, it is little wonder that the Labour Party is splitting at its head. There is now acknowledged open warfare between the prime minister and the chancellor. While they will surely attempt to show a semblance of unity in the run-up to May's poll, there can be little doubt that tensions between the two camps and their supporters will hit the headlines again soon.

A Tale of Two Responses

Issue section: 
Issue: 

Rarely has the contrast been so stark. On the one hand the response by ordinary people to the Indian Ocean tsunami that has killed more than 150,000 people has been overwhelming.

In Britain alone tens of millions of pounds has been collected, with aid agencies reporting that the size and number of donations are at record levels. The generosity by people in other countries has been on a similar scale.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Editorial