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John Coltrane: All That Jazz

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Martin Smith explores jazz, racism and resistance through the life of a legend.

John Coltrane was one of the most important musicians of the 20th century. His saxophone playing revolutionised jazz music not once, not twice, but three times. Today, 35 years after his death, Coltrane remains more popular than he was when he was alive. Almost every modern jazz player has fallen under his spell. Yet his creative spirit reaches beyond the world of jazz. Rock band Audioslave cite Coltrane as a major influence. Hip-hop artists like Mos Def and Talib Kwali, and drum & bass DJs, have borrowed heavily from the Coltrane back catalogue.

War and Resistance: Within Political Inches

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Andrew Murray and Lindsey German reflect on the achievements of the anti-war movement.

Colonial war has now brought Tony Blair and, by extension, the entire New Labour project, to the edge of a richly deserved political abyss. If the most reactionary prime minister ever associated with a democratic labour movement is indeed brought down it will be because of the fall out from the illegal and aggressive Iraq war, of which Ministry of Defence scientist Dr Kelly is just the latest, and particularly poignant, victim.

War and Resistance: A Perversion of Justice

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Britain is colluding in torturing prisoners from the Afghan war.

The British government claims to act as a restraining force on the US military at Guantanamo Bay, but this is far from the truth.

Last month, in a deeply cynical move, the British attorney general, Peter Goldsmith, claimed to have won concessions on the two British Guantanamo Bay detainees, Feroz Abbasi and Moazzam Begg. He announced that the US government had agreed not to seek the death penalty against the two men.

Liberia: Blood and Diamonds

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Leo Zeilig traces the history of the crisis gripping Liberia.

On a demonstration in the Liberian capital Monrovia in June, a demonstrator held up a handmade placard that read 'America Come and Save Us'. The depth of the crisis that has gripped Liberia in the last few months - which has resulted in thousands fleeing their homes and thousands more being killed in fighting - has led many to hope that the US would intervene to stop the fighting. In August the president, Charles Taylor, was forced to step down and was granted asylum by the Nigerian government. Taylor was installed in Calabar, in two palatial mansions.

Women and Work: Balancing Act

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Sally Campbell investigates claims that 'time is the new money' for women workers.

The wildcat strike by British Airways (BA) check-in staff at Heathrow Terminal One in July was a fantastic example of workers refusing to accept that we have no power over the multinationals. The unofficial action sparked media frenzy. There was a general agreement that this dispute was new and different from the strikes of yore because it was about time and life issues rather than money.

Chile 1973: The Other 11 September

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Thirty years ago the left wing government of Chile was drowned in blood. Ian Birchall tries to draw lessons from the tragedy.

On 11 September we shall be urged to remember the dead of the World Trade Centre in 2001. Many socialists will also remember another massacre, the Chilean coup of 1973. The important thing is not to mourn, but to learn. The best tribute we can pay to those who died is to draw the lessons from the mistakes they paid for so dearly.

Manifesto for Change: Empower the People

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Chair of the Birmingham Stop the War Coalition Salma Yaqoob proposes her ideas for a progressive alternative to New Labour.

I believe that at this juncture we face some hard choices. In the aftermath of the largest demonstration in British history, when the concerns of the people were put aside by a contemptuous leadership, can any one of us afford to be complacent about the state of democracy in this country? Disillusionment is running deep, and even the trade unions that started the Labour Party are questioning their continued links and financial support to it.

War and Resistance: Summer of Discontent

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Anne Ashford charts the resistance to the occupation of Iraq.

'Is the price, in blood and money, too high?' asked the Economist recently. With the occupation costing $1 billion a week, the UN suffering a devastating attack and 'postwar' casualty figures rising rapidly, some US officials may privately agree. In public, however, Iraqi resistance is the work of 'remnants' of the Ba'ath Party.

Paul Bremer, the US-appointed administrator of Iraq, told reporters that in addition to Ba'ath loyalists, supporters of Osama Bin Laden are the main forces resisting the occupation.

War and Resistance: Bush's Terror Two Years On

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Two years after Washington launched the 'war on terrorism', Alex Callinicos examines the motivations of the neo-cons and the difficulties they face.

Two years ago the world watched in amazement and horror at those scenes of ghastly beauty in Manhattan, as the Twin Towers burned and crumbled and thousands perished against a deep blue sky. In response George W Bush proclaimed the United States to be at war, engaged in 'a monumental struggle of good against evil'. For Tony Blair 9/11 marked the start of a new era. 'There has never been a time when... a study of history provides so little instruction for our present day,' he told the US Congress in July.

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