Film

You Weren't Really There

Issue section: 
Author: 

Review of the 1968 season, National Film Theatre, London

The National Film Theatre's 1968 season continues through December, with an eclectic programme of screenings from the late 1960s. The feverish political climate and the increased opportunities for directorial independence helped create the conditions for some brilliant cinema. Even the least interesting, most obvious choices are still worth seeing on the big screen - Antonioni's visually sumptuous but pretentious Zabriskie Point (which includes a slo-mo shot of a house being blown up to the sound of Pink Floyd), and the overrated drug hippy biker odyssey Easy Rider.

The Revolution Will Not be Digitised

Issue section: 
Author: 

Review of 'Matrix Revolutions', directors Larry and Andy Wachowski

After watching the final instalment of the Matrix franchise (called Revolutions) it is difficult not to conclude that the writers and directors, the Wachowski brothers, should never have succumbed to the commercial pressures to produce two sequels. Compared to most of the expensive rubbish that Hollywood churns out, this is still a superior science fiction movie. However, the problem for both of the sequels is that startling action sequences and dazzling special effects are not enough to make a good film.

Beyond the Boundary

Issue section: 
Author: 

Review of 'Noi the Albino', director Dagur Kari

Set in the remote fjord regions of northern Iceland, Noi the Albino is a quirky, poignant tale that blends comedy and an impending sense of tragedy. It tells the story of Noi (Tomas Lemarquis), an intelligent 17 year old who is frustrated and bored with life in his hometown, which is cut off from the outside world by a white wall of mountains and impenetrable snow. The town, with no more than 100 residents, is far from affluent, with few opportunities for work and even fewer options for entertainment.

Crouching Tarantino Hidden Dialogue

Issue section: 
Author: 

Review of 'Kill Bill: Vol 1', director Quentin Tarantino

Quentin Tarantino has established himself as one of the world's leading film-makers, largely through the original and imaginative reworking of the cinematic genres which have most heavily influenced him. Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction reinvented the American mafia movie. Jackie Brown was a new take on the Blaxploitation pictures of the 1960s and 1970s.

Outlaw Nation

Issue section: 
Issue: 

Review of ’Ned Kelly‘, director Gregor Jordan

Australia at the tail-end of the 19th century was a hard and brutal place. The transportation of convicts had only ended in 1868. The ’freed men‘ - the failed prospectors, the poor - scratched a living of sorts on ’selections‘.

Morgan's Not a Free Man

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Review of ’Cypher‘, director Vincenzo Natali

’I‘m not meant to live in the suburbs!‘ cries Morgan Sullivan during one of several identity crises in the sci-fi tinged thriller Cypher. His exasperation at his continuing normality is the deadpan humorous base on which director Vincenzo Natali builds an engaging, hyper real story of industrial espionage.

More Ken Than Che

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Review of ’Comandante‘, director Oliver Stone

This film is one long interview between US film director Oliver Stone and Fidel Castro, with a few clips and music in between. However, before you start yawning, it is quite entertaining and it is a must-see for anybody who still thinks of Castro as some kind of revolutionary leader.

A Different Beat

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Review of ’Young Adam‘, director David MacKenzie

Young Adam follows the adventures of an amoral young Scot through 1950s Glasgow. This grey, fog-ridden film shows Adam‘s gradual slide into a private hell. We initially meet him fishing the corpse of a young woman out of the Clyde with his boatmate, Les (Peter Mullan). The corpse wearing only a nightdress; naturally, the police soon construct a story around an alleged affair and brutal murder that scandalises Glasgow. As becomes clear, Adam (played with conviction by Ewan McGregor) knows far more about her death than he is prepared to let on.

Hope and Courage

Issue section: 

Review of 'The Boy David Story', director Alex McCall

The Boy David Story follows the life of a baby born in 1974 with a horribly disfigured face - a big hole where a nose should have been, half a mouth and two normal eyes. He was abandoned in a Peruvian forest. He was found and taken to hospital in Lima where the long saga of rehabilitation and plastic surgery began, covering in all 85 operations (70 before he was 14), mostly performed in the US, for which there were few precedents to help the surgeons. Just one of these - using bone from his skull to build a nose - took five hours.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Film