Interview

Emerging from the margins

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In his new book Roddy Slorach describes disability as "a very capitalist condition". He spoke to Socialist Review about myths and movements.

Why did you want to write a book on Marxism and disability?

First, the resurgence of interest in disability politics because of the Tories’ attack on disabled people and their rights and benefits, and the emergence of organisations like Disabled People Against Cuts.

Battering down the fortress

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Author Matthew Carr speaks to Socialist Review about the political significance of the current refugee crisis on the borders of Europe.

There has been a lot of talk by the media saying this is the biggest reefugee crisis since the Second World War. What do you make of it?

On one level it’s true. It’s the largest numbers of refugees since just after the war. It is a major refugee crisis, although really it’s been brewing for some time and it’s a rather belated recognition of how serious it is.

Unionising the room factory

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Socialist Review spoke to Ewa Jasiewicz and Rafel Sanchis of the Unite Hotel Workers Branch about organising in the hospitality industry

What are the key issues that hotel workers face in London today?

Ewa: There are many different departments that make up the hotel team — or what I call the factory. We have this idea of hotels as luxurious and elegant places where people have a good time, and on the face of it this is true.

But behind the scenes is this very strict, micro-managed, pressurised environment, where agency work, casualisation, zero hour contracts, understaffing and poverty pay are the dominant conditions of employment.

Putting solidarity back into Pride

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Nicola Field and Gethin Roberts of Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners spoke to Socialist Review about politicising this year's Pride season.

We’ve just seen a majority Tory government elected. How will this shape the context of the Pride marches this year and the wider work you are doing through the re-launched Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners (LGSM)?

Nicola: The Tories, who were seen before the election by the bourgeois gay movement as heroes because they brought in gay marriage, have now shown their true colours. The cabinet is full of homophobes, such as the new equalities minister, Caroline Dinenage, who voted against equal marriage.

Citizens and socialists in Hong Kong

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We revisit Hong Kong-based socialist Au Loong Yu to talk about the dangers and opportunities that have emerged from Occupy Central.

What is the state of the Occupy Central movement now?

Many people want to continue the movement but some of the pan-Democratic parties [those who support democratic reform] don’t know what to do practically. The biggest issue is the passing of the bill implementing Beijing’s favoured system of electing Hong Kong’s government.

A socialist case for Ukraine

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On the anniversary of the fall of Ukrainian President Yanukovych, which marked the onset of the current conflict, Rob Ferguson and Tomas Tengely-Evans interview Volodymyr Ishchenko in Kiev.

RF: Volodymyr, there is currently a crisis over the ceasefire in the east and the retreat from Debaltseve. What is your judgement of the crisis in the east of Ukraine?

Call for global resistance

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Saladin Ambar, author of Malcolm X at the Oxford Union, spoke to Socialist Review about Malcolm's historic 1964 speech, and why his ideas will remain relevant as long as oppression persists.

I was looking at Malcolm X speeches for my students and I came across the Oxford speech. The more I looked at it the more I thought this was not just a speech; it was a moment. There was this “Oxford moment” both in Malcolm’s life and in the political life of the UK with the 1964 election and a changing dynamic in terms of colonialism, and in the US, with race relations starting to go in a different direction.

Still fighting for justice

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Tony Stock

Author Jon Robins spoke to Matt Foot about the decades old campaign to clear the name of a man wrongly jailed for robbery in 1970.

The case of Tony Stock is one of the longest running miscarriages of justice and encapsulates all that is wrong with the criminal justice system. Stock was convicted in 1970 of an armed robbery and sentenced to ten years in prison. Juries get it wrong because the evidence they are presented supports a conviction. Invariably this is because the evidence itself has been distorted, or important evidence is ignored or hidden. The witness who identified Stock did so after being driven 71 miles with the investigating officer to Stock’s home.

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