Letters

'People Think That Going on Strike is Fun'

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

The central plank of Tony Blair's justification for his attack on public services is that privatisation is more efficient. Yet as the experience of Railtrack has shown, and as was reported by Judith Orr last month (February SR), this is not true.

Today there is a sense on the railways that the Blair bubble has burst. This is seen not just in the fact that left winger Bob Crow has been elected as leader of the RMT, but also in the new mood of bitterness. Years of frustration among drivers on South West Trains led to them taking strike action. Now in the TSSA union we are finding there are similar signs of militancy--booking office staff on Arriva Northern are now being balloted in conjunction with RMT members. This is a major shift for a union that has a less than militant history.

Racism: The soft underbelly of America

Issue section: 
Issue: 

Shortly after the 'Guardian' published my essay on why blacks should fight against the war, someone e-mailed me.

'Dear Swine,' he politely began, 'you will be exterminated.' The message was anonymously signed, 'An American.' The fact that the man's full name and address appeared in the e-mail header tells us two things about this war--namely that it is founded on both ignorance and racism. To stop the war we will need to counter both. I would like to suggest how.

Streetwise

Issue section: 
Issue: 

The student anti-war movement continues to build here [in Berkeley, California, USA].

On 10 and 11 November the Berkeley Stop the War Coalition (BSTWC) hosted the California Schools Against the War(C-SAW) conference, which was one of three major regional anti-war conferences that weekend. The Northeast and Midwest regional conferences each drew about 200 to 300 student activists. Berkeley's conference drew about 1,000 activists for a weekend of discussions workshops and planning.

Courage of our Convictions

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

The discussion between Luca Casarini and Alex Callinicos was fascinating both for the wide areas where Luca and Alex agreed as well as where they disagreed.

As Luca points out, however, Genoa raised the issue of how the movement was to develop, and the question has been sharpened by the 'war on terrorism'. We are now fighting not only the giant corporations and the global institutions of capital but also their armed wing.

Courage of our Convictions

Issue section: 
Issue: 

I've just read the discussion between Luca Casarini and Alex Callinicos on war and state repression (December SR).

There are a few points I'd like to focus on. First of all, the issue of leadership. In Italy we're seeing the rise of a big movement against capitalism. Even after 11 September we have been able to organise massive demonstrations against the war and for labour rights. The problem is that the desire for change will be tragically dispersed and lost if it is not directed at challenging the system. So at the moment it's not a question of showing the way to others, which is the logic of the masses and the vanguard.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Letters