Opinion

Support your local Trans Pride

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 
Trans Pride Liverpool 2019

Trans Pride marches have grown as a response to the commercialisation of Pride and the marginalisation of trans people. Kelly Stubbs argues that every socialist and trade unionist should back the marches.

The current leadership contest within the Labour Party has recently been focused on issues of how to relate to the transgender community.

The sharp end of this has been centred on the way that a minority of those who see themselves as on the left oppose transgender rights, by falsely counterposing trans rights to cis-women’s rights.

This is a false opposition and the candidates who are arguing for support of all women’s rights — both trans and cis, must have our support.

Dispensable human rights

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

The British government’s treatment of Shamima Begum will not only scare every black and Asian citizen, but will also fail to deal with the root causes of young people’s political disaffection, writes Ndella Paye.

Shamima Begum is a 20-year-old British woman with parents of Bangladeshi heritage. She left London in 2015 at the age of 15 with two friends to join the Islamic State in Syria.

Once there, she married a man and had three children who died from malnutrition and disease. Her last son died of pneumonia just a few days after his birth in March 2019 in a Syrian refugee camp.

Alfred Mendes: Hope amid the horror of 1917

Issue section: 

Despite its title, the new award-winning epic film 1917 directed by Sam Mendes is a war film about the Western front rather than the Russian Revolution. But the life of Mendes’s socialist grandfather, Alfred Mendes (1897-1991), whose war stories inspired the film, reveals something of the influence of the Russian Revolution on colonial subjects of the British Empire.

Alfred Mendes was born into a Portuguese creole merchant family in colonial Trinidad and was educated at elite local schools and then from 1912 in England, at Hitchin Grammar School in Hertfordshire.

After the First World War broke out in 1914, Mendes was called home to Trinidad by his father, but out of “insatiable curiosity” rather than patriotism, in 1915 he decided to join the Merchants’ Contingents of Trinidad, a scheme financed by colonial merchants and designed for young men of the upper middle classes to join English regiments.

Off the shelf: The Closing Circle

Issue section: 
Author: 

Readers recommend an old or forgotten text that is worth revisiting. This month Martin Empson highlights an early work of radical ecology.

Barry Commoner’s 1971 book The Closing Circle is a nearly forgotten classic of radical ecology. Reading it nearly 50 years later the starkness of its warning about the coming ecological disaster is remarkable.

A tribute to Nita Sanghera

Issue section: 
Author: 

The untimely death of Nita Sanghera is a shock to us all. The UCU and the labour and trade union movement as a whole has been robbed of one of its most courageous fighters for justice, writes Sean Vernell.

Nita fizzed with energy and passion. Her sartorial elegance and smile matched her warm and outgoing personality. She filled a room with her presence and inspired all those around her. She was proud to have been elected as UCU’s first black woman president and even more so because she stood as a candidate from the Further Education (FE) sector.

Angela Davis: An icon and an inspiration

Issue section: 
Author: 

In the final column on the life, politics and activism of Angela Davis, we look at her contributions to theory and practice.

Angela Davis is still active to this day, and her politics continue to be shaped by having once been a member of the Communist Party. Being a revolutionary socialist and a member of an organisation enabled Davis to recognise and analyse racism beyond her own experience. The party had been key in developing her understanding of the role of oppression within capitalism, placing it within the context of class and capitalism.

Trump's deal is a disaster for Palestinians

Issue section: 

With much fanfare and mutual backslapping, Donald Trump and Binyamin Netanyahu launched the US government’s “peace plan” at a glitzy press conference on 28 January. In addition to the world’s media, three Gulf states sent their ambassadors: the UAE, Bahrain and Oman (although the Omani ambassador confided to the Times of Israel that he didn’t even know what was in the document).

SNP taps anger in Scotland

Issue section: 
Issue: 

The general election looked very different north of the border. Bob Fotheringham outlines the dynamics of independence, the disappointment in Scottish Labour and the anti-Tory feeling that shaped the result.

Politically, the difference between England and Scotland could not be starker.

The Tories won 47 percent of the popular vote in England. In Scotland the SNP won 45 percent with Labour at 19 percent and the Tories on 25 percent. How can the difference be accounted for?

Pages

Subscribe to Opinion