Opinion

Peace at Stake

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Britain's filthy role in Northern Ireland is exposed by the Stakeknife affair.

Tom Lehrer, the brilliant American musical satirist of the 1950s and 1960s, famously announced that he was retiring from satire after the warmongering monster Henry Kissinger was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. When the world was satirising itself in such a way, what was there left for him to say, he asked.

Denying Dissent

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

It has sometimes been difficult to find accurate information about what is actually happening in Iraq.

Embedded journalists only put a highly censored story. It is not surprising, then, that alternative news sources on the web have been the subject of intense debate and in some cases censorship. The nature of the internet makes websites particularly sensitive to attack or closure if their content doesn't meet the approval of the people whose computers run the site, or those with the skills to cause damage.

Camp X-Ray on the NHS

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Look which US company is at the front of the queue for Iraq contracts.

What connection could there be between Texas, Vietnam, Camp X-Ray, US vice-president Dick Cheney and computerisation of the National Health Service? The answer, of course, is Halliburton--the US corporation which has been handed one of the first contracts for 'reconstruction' in Iraq and which the folks back in England are only just beginning to find out about.

Only the Beginning

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

The US military may have succeeded in Iraq but now the problems are beginning to mount up.

Defeating Saddam Hussein's armed forces was the easy bit for US imperialism, even if victory was not quite as quick as the White House had hoped. Its real difficulties start now.

Already there are signs of massive resistance to the continuing US occupation of Iraq on the one side, and of splits over what to do next within the US administration on the other. To understand why, it is necessary to be clear what the war was about.

Memories Were Made of This

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

If we can explain and understand the past, we will then be able to shape the future.

In the last few weeks the Spanish government has begun to excavate graves where civilian prisoners were buried during, or immediately after, the Spanish Civil War. It might seem an odd thing to do, so long after the event, when even the relatives will barely remember their lost husbands or wives, or cousins, or parents. Yet the families of those murdered by paramilitary gangs or off-duty soldiers in country after country have fought relentlessly for the right to know where and when their dead were buried, and by whom.

Senseless and Selfish Carnage

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

The war will not lead to the liberation of ordinary Iraqis.

As I watched the statues crash to the ground I felt a strange sadness, and a real anger. Back in 1978 I was on the executive of the National Union of Students. I remember voting for a motion condemning the Ba'athist regime in Iraq. At the time, no one in the British establishment gave a damn about democracy in Iraq, the fate of the Iraqi people or what weapons the regime had.

Leader of the Pack

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

The war in Iraq has exposed splits between the imperial powers.

The spectacle of French president jacques Chirac trying to block George Bush's path to war was one few people would have predicted in May last year when he was reelected president. The French ruling class had happily taken part in the last three US-UK wars, against Iraq, Serbia and Afghanistan. And France has its own very dirty record of imperialist violence in Africa. To see what motivated Chirac it is necessary first to be clear about the reasons for Bush's push to war.

Theatre Enters Stage Left

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Theatre can be a forum for debate and encourage collective action.

Recently I was rereading some of John McGrath's essays on political theatre in his book 'Naked Thoughts That Roam About'. McGrath, who died last year, set up the 7:84 theatre group (7 percent owning 84 percent of the wealth) to create an agitprop theatre for the generation of anti Vietnam War protesters.

Pages

Subscribe to Opinion