Socialist Review issue

September 2004 #288

The heat is on the bosses

News

by Editorial

July 18 2004 will be remembered by all those associated with Socialist Review magazine as the day when we heard the shocking news of the...

by Editorial

The bloody standoff continues in Najaf as we go to press, despite claims by interim (for which read 'puppet') prime minister Iyad Allawi that the...

Ten minutes drive from Charlton Athletic's football stadium in south east London, ten prisoners languish in Belmarsh prison. They have not been...

by Alice Livingstone Boomla

Millwall is another area where Respect can gain.

by Lindsey German

'There aren't many Muslim votes in Hartlepool,' was the cynical response of a Blair aide when asked whether Labour stood to lose one of its safest...

by Sabby Sagall

Up to 7,600 Palestinian political prisoners in four different prisons have begun an open-ended hunger strike in protest against the appalling...

Rose Gentle made this statement on 19 August, the day she and her daughter Maxine delivered a letter to Downing Street protesting the decision to...

by Bill Richardson

The upcoming Australian federal election, which the government could call any time now, raises the possibility that Liberal (conservative) leader...

by James Meadway

Viewers of HBO's flagship talk-show, Real Time with Bill Maher, were in for a treat a few weeks ago. Sharing the desk with Maher were...

by Andrew Stone

Does humanity face an ugly choice between the devastation of global warming and potentially lethal nuclear waste?

Features

Feature
Peter Morgan

Strikes and pickets are now back in the news. Pay heads a list of grievances that express growing frustration with New Labour. Peter Morgan explains why workers are getting more awkward.

Feature
Martin Smith

Battle lines are being drawn between Labour and the unions. But how will the awkward squad deal with the issues?

Feature
Chris Harman

In a recent speech delivered in Porto Alegre, Chris Harman explains why the US is staking its imperial future on Iraq.

Feature
Chris Nineham

The European anti-capitalist movement will descend on London next month. Chris Nineham looks forward to an event of debates and demonstrations.

Feature
Tom Hickey, Ian McDonald

Asian Dub Foundation is one of the most radical and vibrant bands to have appeared on the music scene over the last decade. In May they premiered an original soundtrack to the classic film The...

Feature
Tom Hickey

From June 1956 to October 1957 the Algerian liberation struggle was fought in the capital, Algiers. Tom Hickey looks at the history and its representation in The Battle of Algiers.

Opinion

Columnists
by Martin Empson

Hardly anyone noticed, but a month back the consultation stage for the government's paper on identity cards closed. This is the first step towards their introduction.

Columnists
by The Walrus

Silently and majestically, the good ship John Prescott slipped effortlessly into a new safe haven over the summer recess.

Columnists
by Mike Davis

On 1 September 1934 millions of cotton spindles stopped spinning.

Columnists
by Andrew Stone

Forget Glastonbury, the Olympics and the Edinburgh Festival: the real event of the summer had no need for sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll.

Letters

by Adam Marks

I find it really disappointing that many people on the left are still stuck in the navel-gazing mode.

by Kambiz Boomla

Kevin Morton, the Tower Hamlets Labour councillor, should be ashamed of his recent remarks in which he compared Oliur Rahman's historic victory for Respect in the St Dunstan's and Stepney Green by...

by Hugh Lowe

Following John P Johnston's excellent letter (July/August SR), at 82 and a longstanding member of the campaigning...

by Eve R Light

As a regular reader of Socialist Review I'm going to miss the monthly ritual of turning straight to the back page to read Pat Stack's column.

Reviews

Books

Review of 'Revolutionary Portraits: William Shakespeare', Michael Rosen and 'Revolutionary Portraits: William Blake', Judy Cox, Redwords, both £5.99

Books
by Alice Livingstone Boomla

Review of 'The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists', Robert Tressell, Penguin £8.99

Books
by Gareth Jenkins

Review of 'Sartre Against Stalinism', Ian Birchall, Berghahn Books £16.99

Books
by Colin Wilson

Review of 'Villains of All Nations', Marcus Rediker, Verso £18.99

Books
by Kieran Crowe

Review of 'Rebel City', John Newsinger, Merlin Press £14.95

Books
by Tony Phillips

Review of 'Marx's Capital', Ben Fine and Alfredo Saad-Filho, Pluto £9.99

Books
by Alan Gibson

Review of 'Bloody Foreigners', Robert Winder, Little Brown £20

Books
by Ian Birchall

Review of 'Endgames and New Times', Geoff Andrews, Lawrence & Wishart £15.99

Books
by Martin Empson

Review of 'The Bomb', Gerard DeGroot, Jonathan Cape £18.99

Books
by Neil Davidson

Review of 'Dissident Marxism', David Renton, Zed Books £14.95

Books
by Phil Knight

Dylan Thomas anniversary

Books
by Hazel Croft

Book clubs - new novels

Film
by Phil Whaite

Review of 'Ae Fond Kiss', director Ken Loach

Film
by Sarah Ensor

Review of 'Supersize Me', director Morgan Spurlock

Film
by Stephen Philip

Review of 'Code 46', director Michael Winterbottom

Film
by Nigel Davey

Review of 'The Terminal', director Steven Spielberg, 'The Alamo', director John Lee Hancock and 'Collateral', director Michael Mann

Film
by Simon Fuller

Review of 'The Life and Times of Peter Sellers', director Stephen Hopkins and 'Open Water', director Chris Kentis

Theatre
by Keith McKenna

Review of Edinburgh Festival Fringe

Music
by Charlie Kimber

Charlie Kimber discovers an unlikely festival sensation.

Music
by Brian Richardson

Review of 'A Grand Don't Come for Free' by The Streets

Art / Exhibitions
by Andrew Stone

Review of photographs by Yann Arthus-Bertrand, Royal Botanic Gardens, Edinburgh, and Birmingham Victoria Square