Cartoons

My Life as a Courgette

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This lovingly made stop-motion animation tackles difficult realities in a straightforward way that can speak to adults and children alike. The brightly coloured models with huge heads and even huger eyes convey a remarkable range of emotion.

Dealing with trauma is not new in animations aimed at a family audience, but rarely is it done entirely without irony or metaphor or cute animals.

30 Years of Steve Bell

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Nicholas Garland writes in the exhibition catalogue that accompanies this exhibition that "Steve Bell is the greatest political cartoonist of the day". I would also suggest that he is perhaps one of the most important artists of his generation.

I don't mean this in the narrow sense that his drawings and mark making are those of an artist and craftsman of the highest quality who has, over the years, honed his considerable artistic ability to produce work of the finest quality.

Joe Sacco: A long drawn out conflict

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Joe Sacco talks to Tim Sanders and Patrick Ward about how he got into comic journalism and the power of cartoons

Why did you decide to make your new book, Footnotes in Gaza?

I went to the Gaza Strip with Chris Hedges, an American journalist for Harper's magazine. He was writing and I was illustrating. This was at the beginning of the second Intifada. We decided that we would focus on one town in Gaza, Khan Yunis.

Interview: The Pen is Funnier Than the Sword

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Satirical cartoonist Michael Leunig discusses art and politics with Peter Morgan.

Can you tell us some of your personal and political history?

I was born at the end of the Second World War in the western industrial suburbs of Melbourne; I grew up in a working class family - my father worked in an abattoir - and I grew up with a left wing outlook. My father was a communist in the 1950s when the Communist Party was illegal in Australia. I also grew up surrounded by migrants - people who'd been through the Second World War and were traumatised refugees.

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