Egypt

Briefing: The main currents of Egypt's Islamists

Issue section: 
Author: 

Salafis

Salafis have been concerned mainly with details of ritual, dress and personal morality. They are often referred to in Egypt as "Sunnis", with the implication that they are concerned overwhelmingly with the Sunna ("the way"/"the path") associated with key traditions of Islam and with the practice of the Prophet Muhammad. They are followers of the salaf (predecessors or forefathers) - the Prophet and the founding community of Muslims of the 7th century AD.

Can the Islamists limit Egypt's revolution?

Issue section: 
Author: 

The Islamist mass rally in Cairo on 29 July showed the deepening alliance between some Islamists and the ruling army council. But, argues
Phil Marfleet, the Islamists are an unstable coalition whose ability to contain the revolution is far from established.

The first appearance of Islamists in a mass rally in Tahrir Square in late July brought predictable reactions in European and American media: Islamic activists were "hijacking" the revolution; they would soon overwhelm its secular activists; they would demonstrate that radical change was impossible in a predominantly Muslim society.

The Islamists and the Egyptian Revolution

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Egyptian socialist Sameh Naguib looks at the role of Islamists in the Egyptian Revolution

There is something of a state of hysteria in the discussions on the left and among the liberals about the Islamist movement in Egypt at present, fuelled by the fact that while we are in the first stages of the biggest popular revolution in Egypt's history, the forces of the left are small and divided, but the Muslim Brotherhood is the biggest organisation on the Egyptian political scene. This state of hysteria has increased with the entry of the Salafists and the extremist Islamist groups into the political arena.

Confusion

Act II of the Egyptian Revolution

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

The revolutionary process in Egypt is deepening. There is now a protracted struggle going on to shape Egypt's future, as the ruling Military Council seeks to counter militancy from below. Phil Marfleet looks at Act II of the Egyptian Revolution

Act I of the Egyptian Revolution culminated with the fall of the dictator. Act II is a far more complex process in which Egyptians address the problem of the dictatorship. How to consolidate and expand their new freedoms? How to continue the momentum of change? How to alleviate the problems of everyday life? How to challenge military rule?

The culture of the revolution

Issue section: 
Issue: 

Our occupation of Tahrir Square created a massive resistance-laden space for chants, songs, posters and placards. As the days passed, and as Hosni Mubarak refused to go, we became even more creative


Young people were the most creative in composing lyrics in vernacular Egyptian Arabic. The chants articulated our unity in wanting to bring down the regime: "Egypt, our mother/ Here are your sons/ Here are your daughters/ For you, they have suffered/ For you, they are willing to die!" and "What does Mubarak want?/ He wants us to kiss his shoes/ No, Mubarak, we shall never surrender/ Tomorrow, we shall stamp you with our shoes!"

Mubarak: ally of imperialism

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

For 30 years Egypt has been the linchpin of US and Israeli domination across the Middle East. Simon Assaf charts the history of Western support for Mubarak and the consequences of his downfall

When the mass demonstrations that swept Egypt turned into an insurrection, US president Barack Obama demanded to know why Middle East experts in Washington failed to predict that a revolution was about to sweep away its most important ally in the Arab world.

Boycott, divestment, sanctions

Issue section: 
Author: 

The flotilla attack sparked protests and solidarity worldwide. Phil Marfleet reports on the growing Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement, which can offer a focus for solidarity with Gaza.

Gaza has been under occupation for over 40 years but international interest has seldom been as intense and international solidarity rarely as effective as since the recent killings at sea.

Egypt's tax collectors and the fight for independent trade unions

Issue section: 

Historically regarded as one of the state's tools of repression, Egypt's property tax collectors are today spearheading the fight for independent trade unions.

Last year, 55,000 property tax collectors went on a national strike, demanding an improvement in their working conditions. The strike lasted for three months in autumn, during which tax collection dropped by 90 percent in Egypt. Victory was achieved with an 11 day sit-in in downtown Cairo, in front of the ministerial cabinet in December. More than 5,000 men and women civil servants camped out together with their children, chanting against the government, singing and banging their drums. The finance ministry conceded to their demands, raising their salaries by 325 percent.

Egyptian Strikes: More than bread and butter

Issue section: 
Issue: 

What impact has the recent strike wave and protest had on Egyptian society? Egyptian revolutionary socialist Hossam el-Hamalawy argues that the struggles of the working class are central to the growing confidence of the opposition movement to dictator Hosni Mubarrak

The mass demonstrations and strikes that have swept Egypt over the last year have transformed the opposition movement. For decades Egyptians lived in fear of the regime - opposition activists were rounded up, imprisoned and tortured, and strikers gunned down - now this has changed. The two days of rioting in the textile mill town of Mahalla al-Kubra recently have shaken the regime. The Mahalla intifada - as it is now called - is part of a wider phenomenon engulfing the country. We are living in an era of growing militancy.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Egypt