Heathrow

British Airways: The mundane reality

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Last month's ballot result for industrial action by British Airways cabin crews showed how widespread the fear and anger about management attacks was.

With an 80 percent turnout, it was not just a militant minority who voted by 92.5 percent to strike.

The BBC described the move as "nuclear". But British Airways left its cabin crew with no choice.

Yet we were denied the right to strike by the courts. How can any strike ballot be legal under these anti-union laws? There will always be a turnover of staff in big organisations like BA.

Even if you took out the 1,000 union members who should not have got ballot papers there would still have been a huge mandate for a strike.

Heathrow - third runway flies in face of good sense

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As Socialist Review went to press protesters were due to converge on Heathrow in a demonstration to oppose the airport's expansion.

The groundswell against a third runway demands attention. But other voices have the ears of Gordon Brown's government - the lobbyists for British Airways (BA), airport operator BAA and the bosses' CBI. BA's future profits require expansion if they are to follow the record £875 million operating profit in the year to March.

Industry: Anger and Optimism

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Recent disputes have shown a growing confidence and militancy among workers, argues Moira Nolan.

In a summer of iconic images, two much-pictured events may prove to have a lasting impact on class struggle in Britain in the coming months: the chaos at Heathrow Airport following the solidarity walkouts by BA workers and the hilltop protests by their fellow T&G members, the Gate Gourmet workers. These two events sum up both the injustice of working life in Blair's Britain and the power of workers to do something about it.

Heathrow Dispute: Bring the Bosses Down to Earth

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Strikes and solidarity are needed to bring the Gate Gourmet bosses' union busting operation to a standstill, argues The Walrus.

One of the most interesting aspects of the Gate Gourmet dispute has been the way it has taken the lid off what goes on at Heathrow airport - the biggest workplace in Britain. Concerted attempts by parts of the media and by the BA boss, Rod Eddington, to whip up an outcry over unofficial strike action have not been at all effective - mainly because the overwhelming impression has been that of a wildcat management acting in the most despicable fashion against a workforce made up almost entirely of Asian workers.

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