Housing

Cathy

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Cathy Come Home, the 1966 BBC TV play directed by Ken Loach, exposed how unemployment, poverty and overcrowded and inadequate housing were condemning thousands of families to homelessness — and dividing parents from their children. The play provoked a public outcry, the setting up of homelessness charity Crisis, and eventually the Housing (Homeless Persons) Act of 1977.

Grenfell: ‘We can leave a legacy so this never happens again’

Issue section: 
Author: 

Months on from the tower block fire that shook Britain, Socialist Review spoke to Justice4Grenfell activist Moyra Samuels about how the community is coping and what the campaign is planning.

Seven months after the fire what is the feeling within the community?

The raw emotional pain has subsided a little bit and has been replaced by this enormous anger because it’s become obvious that the council and the government can’t organise a piss up in a brewery.

No room for racism

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Decades of underinvestment in social housing have had a disproportionate effect on black communities in Britain and the US, writes Glyn Robbins.

George Clooney’s recent film Suburbicon lampoons the hypocrisy of the archetypal American suburb. Alongside a fictional crime caper, it tells the true story of the first African-American family to move to a neighbourhood previously reserved for whites. The Mayer family in the film is based on the Myers family who, in 1957, moved to Levittown, Pennsylvania. As the film depicts, they met with vicious organised racism (including the involvement of the Ku Klux Klan) aimed at driving them out.

Big Capital

Issue section: 

Big Capital is a neatly packaged explication of London’s housing crisis with an emphasis on those who most suffer from it.

The main campaigns against social cleansing are examined, and the kleptocratic property industry is exposed. Along the way there are some startling revelations, like the out of work actor who got paid to pretend he was a resident in order to support a controversial development, or the treatment of single mothers and their children who were shipped out of London to Boundary House, a squalid ex-student residence in Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire.

After Grenfell: joining the dots

Issue section: 
Author: 

Grenfell Tower was a disaster waiting to happen. I’ve been responsible for looking after council tower blocks in the past, including some with cladding. I shudder to think about it now.

Grenfell could have happened anywhere. The lack of adequate fire safety is a deadly symptom of how council housing has been neglected for decades. Its mismanaged decline is the result of deliberate government policies of underinvestment and denigration.

Hurricane Katrina and the 'cleansing' of social housing

Issue section: 
Author: 

Grenfell has been referred to as a “Katrina moment”. Care must be taken with that comparison. But the reaction of the establishment would certainly be recognised by working class people in New Orleans.

Theresa “Antoinette” May’s detachment and ignorance call to mind Barbara Bush’s comment in 2005 that for people who lost their home after the hurricane and were living in shelters things were “working very well” because they were “underprivileged anyway”.

There's No Place

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

The spectacle of President Trump rubbing his hands together in delight as he visits the ruined underwater city of Houston perplexed me to begin with; even for a man that strange, this was bizarre behaviour, surely?

Then I read Glyn Robbins’s new book and the penny dropped — Trump is a property developer. The destruction of homes and immiseration of the poorest people doesn’t evoke empathy. For him and his fellow developers it is an opportunity to mop up.

Housing activists plan for action

Issue section: 
Author: 

A summit meeting in London last month to plan next steps against the Housing and Planning Act drew 250 people in a serious and determined mood. They included council, housing association, co-op and private tenants, union members and several local councillors.

Among them was the elected mayor of Hackney, Philip Glanville, who repeated his council’s opposition to the Act and called on other councils to join the campaign against it.

Housing Act passed

Issue section: 
Issue: 

The Housing and Planning Act was passed in parliament last month, threatening to make the housing crisis much worse for millions of people. The government pushed ahead despite objections from tenant, housing and homeless groups, local authorities, academics, trade unions, faith leaders and community organisations.

Can we kill the Housing Bill?

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

The Tory government's Housing and Planning Bill, currently making its way through parliament, is a disaster for tenants. Housing activist Eileen Short looks at the potential consequences of the bill, and at the growing movement against it by tenants, trade unionists and campaigners.

Last month 10,000 people demonstrated in central London against the Housing and Planning Bill. A national movement is growing against the government’s plans. Some of the biggest meetings for a generation have been packed with angry people worried about the future of their homes, families and communities. A broad alliance of tenants (council, housing association and private), trade unionists and housing activists is uniting behind a banner that says, “Kill the Housing Bill; Secure homes for all; Control rents”.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Housing