Ireland

Between austerity and resistance

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Ireland has been hailed as an austerity success story. Kieran Allen examines the reality behind the hype and the prospects for resistance from below.

Ireland's exit from the Troika - the International Monetary Fund (IMF), European Union (EU) and European Central Bank (ECB) - bailout programme on 16 December is being celebrated as proof that austerity works. The storyline from the Irish ruling class is that sovereignty has been regained. They claim that 85 percent of the "heavy lifting" has been done and only a little more sacrifice needs to be squeezed from the population. The EU elite see the exit as a much-needed propaganda point to counter the growing criticism of their doctrine of "expansionary austerity".

'A titanic struggle'

Issue section: 

The revolutionary socialist James Connolly played a key role in the Dublin Lockout, taking over the leadership of the ITWU when Larkin was arrested. He wrote this article in the British socialist paper, the Daily Herald, in December 1913 as part of the fight to win solidarity from British workers.

What is the truth about the Dublin dispute?

In the year 1911 the National Seamen's and Firemen's Union, as a last desperate expedient to avoid extinction, resolved upon calling a general strike in all the home ports... the call was in danger of falling upon deaf ears, and was, in fact, but little heeded until the Irish Transport and General Workers' Union began to take a hand in the game.

The stamp of militancy

Issue section: 
Author: 

One hundred years ago thousands of workers took part in what became known as the Great Dublin Lockout.

The Irish state postal service recently issued a series of stamps showing scenes from the Great Dublin Lockout of 1913. The stamps are very handsome, but this isn't the point. Rather it is the irony of the government issuing them being responsible for imposing the worst cuts in living memory on Irish workers. This shows how important it is to properly recall the memory of the events of 1913. For the lockout is not just the most important struggle of the Irish working class; it is also one of the most important industrial episodes in British history.

Ireland

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Brian O'Boyle considers the growing militant anti-austerity movement in Ireland

The Irish economic crash has been almost without parallel in Western Europe. Having previously been held up as a poster boy for neoliberalism Irish capitalism went into freefall in late 2008, as hundreds of thousands lost their jobs and the banking system rapidly disintegrated. The Celtic Tiger "miracle" turned out to be a mirage and it was the particular rhythm of Irish neoliberalism that can best account for the boom, the bubble and the disastrous bust.

Greece and Ireland: A Tale of Two Crises

Issue section: 

Across Europe austerity is being imposed - but it is often met with resistance. Nikos Loudos draws lessons from the explosive struggles of Greek workers, while Marnie Holborow exposes the desperation of Ireland's ruling class, whose neoliberal economy has become Europe's weak link.


GREECE: CRUCIBLE OF RESISTANCE


Greek workers show the way

Greece, Ireland and the eurozone crisis

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

Pigs. It's not an insult as such, but that depends on what it's referring to.

In this case it's an acronym coined by "economic analysts" to describe the European countries that have been hardest hit by the recession: Portugal, Ireland, Greece and Spain.

Now, I happen to be Irish, but I'm not particularly nationally-minded, so on one level it doesn't bother me all that much. However, when you consider who these "economic analysts" are, and what their role has been in the crisis affecting Greece, it's a different story.

Crystal clear intentions

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

We're in occupation to stop our factory from being shut down. The glass industry in Waterford is making a profit but not enough to satisfy corporate greed.

Waterford Crystal management had ambitions to expand and borrowed money to buy companies, using Waterford and Wedgwood to fund their debts. As the debts got larger they were harder to repay. When the Bank of America called in their loans we went into the receiver's hands and became victims of venture capitalists, KPS Capital Partners.

Letter from Ireland

Issue section: 

Ireland's rejection of the Lisbon Reform Treaty went against the wishes and deceptions of the ruling elite, writes Richard Boyd Barrett

Irish voters delivered a major blow to the plans of Europe's rulers and the Irish political establishment by voting against the Lisbon Reform Treaty on 12 June. Supporters of Lisbon have been quick to try and frighten the Irish public with the consequences of their No vote - a continuation of the strategy of the Yes side during the campaign.

Irish elections: new dancing partners for Fianna Fáil

Issue section: 
Author: 

The Irish elections saw Fianna Fáil emerge again as the largest party, but without an overall majority.

Fine Gael, the other right wing party also increased its representation in the Dail, but with 27 fewer seats than its rival. However, it is in the search for coalition partners that the real story of the election emerges, with important lessons for the left.

The three main parties of the left - Labour, Sinn Féin and the Greens - each indicated in advance they would be prepared to form a coalition with one or other of the two main parties. Consequently any left-right division was blurred and no clear left alternative offered to voters.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Ireland