Libya

Anger in Benghazi

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Libya has erupted once again in protest. In January an angry crowd of some 2,000 people stormed the offices of the ruling National Transitional Council (NTC) in Benghazi, the birthplace of the revolution. NTC leaders were planning to announce the publication of the new electoral law that evening but were forced to transfer the announcement to Tripoli.

The Benghazi crowds smashed computer equipment and refused to allow NTC chief Mustafa Abdel Jalil to address them. They then torched his armoured Land Rover. The immediate impact of the protest was to force the resignation of NTC number two, and former Gaddafi-era minister, Abdel Hafiz Ghoga.

Libya: The West's new client?

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The uprising in Libya was inspired by the revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt. But the intervention of Nato forces changed the situation dramatically. Simon Assaf asks if Libya is now destined to become a client state of Western powers or whether its revolution could revive

The revolution itself appears to have stopped, becoming instead a Western-backed revolt. While in Egypt young revolutionaries are storming the Israeli embassy, in Libya Western leaders are greeted as heroes. French, US and British flags fly over the centre of Benghazi. In Cairo these flags are being torn down.

Libya: at the crossroads

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Libya's revolution faces stark choices. Simon Assaf looks at the roots of Gaddafi's regime and the danger posed by Western intervention

As we go to press, Libya's revolution is at a crossroads. The uprising that erupted on 17 February faces two dangers - the possibility that an offensive by the regime of Muammar Gaddafi could crush the revolt, and that the West could intervene and undermine the revolution. This crisis is not of the revolution's making, but is nonetheless one that throws into sharp relief two possible options - to make an alliance of dependency with Western powers, or to draw on the forces that have been pushing for change across the region.

Another despot falls

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What does the London School of Economics (LSE) have in common with Mariah Carey?

Last month both were exposed as recipients of £1.5 million and $1 million respectively from the Gaddafi family. One can only hope that Carey, like former LSE director Howard Davies, will also be forced by popular pressure to step down from her job.

The downfall of Davies, who called British undergraduate students "loss-making" and international students "high-margin products", has been something to relish.

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