Scottish independence

Scotland feels the Corbyn effect

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The gears are shifting in Scottish Labour, in a direction that Kezia Dugdale didn’t like, as evidenced by her resignation as leader.

She stood down immediately after Jeremy Corbyn’s tour of Scotland in late August, which saw him speak to thousands of supporters — including in Glasgow at the Govanhill Against Racism Carnival and the Central Mosque.

Corbyn has set his focus on developing his support in Scotland through the Campaign for Socialism (CfS) group.

Will Brexit lead to Scottish independence?

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The issue of a second Independence referendum is once again coming to prominence in Scotland.

The UK Tory government’s decision to pursue a “hard Brexit”, remove the UK from the European Single Market and end the free movement of labour puts it strongly in the opposite camp to the Scottish government, which favours both.

It's time to name the day

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It is two years since the inspiring Yes campaign for Scottish independence ended in defeat. Things have moved on, and how.

The SNP won all but two of the Scottish constituencies in the general election in 2015. Scots were again landed with a Tory government they did not vote for. In the Scottish parliament election in May this year the SNP was the top party in the constituency votes but failed to win an overall majority.

Generation Yes

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The Scottish referendum provided a unique opportunity for young people in Scotland to get involved in politics.

Despite the defeat on 18 September, the grassroots nature of the Yes campaign has meant that these activists are not going away. The youth of Scotland is politicised, angry and already fighting for a better world. Thousands of young people were at meetings and on the streets discussing how to scrap Trident, end austerity and protect free education.

Scotland: There's no going back

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The No camp may have won the referendum, but the working class anger that drove the Yes campaign is here to stay. Iain Ferguson reflects on the movement and its fall-out.

As the Scottish independence referendum result was announced on the morning of 19 September, a sigh of relief could be heard from every section of the British and global political elite.

Don't Panic!

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The fear exhibited by the ruling class at the prospect of the break-up of the British state was a sight to behold. John Newsinger looks at the actions of a state machine under pressure.

The Scottish insurgency has been successfully contained by a mixture of threats, scare stories and fraudulent promises, but what a fright it gave the ruling class.

BBC reporter Nick Robinson remarked that he could actually smell Cameron’s and Miliband’s fear when it looked as if the Yes vote was gathering momentum.

It was this fear that led the three party leaders, Miliband, Cameron and Clegg, to make what is likely to become their infamous “vow”. Given the track record of these men one can only admire their nerve.

Cameron's headache

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David Cameron probably has had better days as prime minister than when one of his Eurospectic MPs, Douglas Carswell, defected to Ukip. Even worse, Carswell stepped down from parliament to force a by-election which could lead to Ukip’s first elected MP being returned, just months before a general election. This would be used to say that Ukip is not a wasted vote when it comes to parliamentary, as well as European, elections.

The socialist case for independence

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The prominent Scottish socialist has been speaking to packed meetings across Scotland as part of his Hope Over Fear tour. Here we print extracts from a speech he gave in Paisley in late June.

This referendum is not a barometer of whether you like the SNP or whether you like or loathe Alex Salmond. This vote on 18 September is about the future of your country. It’s bigger than any political party, bigger than any individual.

The vote is for you to have the right to decide who runs our country… Since 1951 Scotland has rejected the greed, the privatisation, the toffee-nosed Tories. And since 1951 Scotland has had to endure 35 years of Tory governments. You vote for independence and you will never have to endure another Tory government in Scotland…

Scotland, independence and the left

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A sense of panic had begun to grip the British establishment as the break up of the United Kingdom looms as a possibility. A sense of panic had begun to grip the British establishment as the break up of the United Kingdom looms as a possibility. Socialists should support the dissolution of a key imperialist state and that the left has been able to shape the independence campaign. argues socialists should support the dissolution of a key imperialist state and that the left has been able to shape the independence campaign.

With two months to go until the Scottish Independence referendum there is a serious whiff of panic coming out of Westminster and from across the Atlantic. Growing fears that opinion polls continue to show a narrowing of the No camp’s lead to around 8 percent have prompted both Barack Obama at the G7 summit and former US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to pitch in to defend the need for a “strong, robust and united Britain”.

Yes: The Radical case for Scottish Independence

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The Radical Case for Scottish Independence covers a wide range of topics including the rise of neoliberalism in Scotland, mainstream parties, British nationalism, and Yes Scotland's and Better Together's respective referendum strategies.

The authors are leading activists in the Radical Independence Campaign (RIC) which attempts to fight for a radical vision for independence. The book is at its best when exposing the poor state of the mainstream debate on independence and the weaknesses of both the official Yes and No camps.

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