Students

‘We don’t want your thoughts and prayers’

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

On 20 April, the 19th anniversary of the Columbine High School massacre, students throughout the US will walk out of school again to demand action over gun control. On 14 March thousands left their classes together at 10am. Then on 24 March they took the fight to the White House.

The movement that has burst onto the stage is militant, informed, and shaped by previous struggles. The last walkout was called by the Women’s March youth branch.

Students: detonators of struggle

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 
Student struggle

During the last 100 years universities have shifted from training grounds of the ruling class to become significant sites of struggle.

The number of people going to universities has significantly expanded as capitalism requires a highly trained workforce. Many students will go on to work in the public sector or take up jobs in call centres, shops and fast food restaurants.

Students when studying are not part of the working class. They do not have to sell their labour power, face the discipline of the workplace and they have greater time to discuss ideas.

Students sell sex to pay for education

Issue section: 
Author: 

A study released earlier this year made the headline-grabbing claim that 5 percent of students are sex workers.

The Student Sex Work Project, based at Swansea University, was set up to explore the specific experiences of student sex workers and review support networks and advice centres inside Higher Education.

The study has reignited debates around sex work, choice and sexuality. Sex work is defined as “the exchange of sexual services, performances and products for material compensation”.

Safe spaces?

Issue section: 
Issue: 

The cancellation of feminist comedian Kate Smurthwaite’s gig at Goldsmiths College in February — possibly out of fear of protests by other feminists over her views on sex work — has escalated into a row over who is allowed to speak on campuses and who decides.
Different examples are being lumped together with little clarity. A recent article in the Guardian is a good example:

A Generation in Revolt

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

For years we have been told that today's students are apathetic. Dave Sewell argues that the "Day X" demonstrations marked the birth of a new student movement.


Image: Loki English

"Bliss was it in that dawn to be alive, but to be young was very heaven."

So the poet Wordsworth hailed the French Revolution of 1789. In 1968 Paris activist Daniel Cohn-Bendit said of 10 May, the night of the barricades:

Top-up fees - Education as luxury

Issue section: 
Issue: 

A recent BBC poll of 53 university vice-chancellors reveals that two thirds want the top-up fee cap to be increased from the current £3,000.

More than half of those polled would like the fees to rise to at least £5,000, with some even calling for either a £20,000 cap or none at all. The poll coincides with the government's announcement that fee levels are to be reviewed this summer.

Students and the Working Class

Issue section: 
Author: 

Something old occurred in a number of countries in the last year, and often seemed like something new. Students' strikes, demonstrations and occupations swept Italy, France, Chile and Greece.

The reaction of the media was to claim these were the actions of a privileged social layer, whose victories would come at the expense of the mass of working class youth, who would never get near a university. So in France they claimed that the students' demand for the end of the CPE law to take away employment rights from young people would make it more difficult for unemployed youth in the suburbs to get jobs.

Student Conference: Delegates of Wrath

Issue section: 
Issue: 
Author: 

A Barclays Bank report released in mid-April found that students graduating this year will owe a total of £2.46 billion, £13,501 on average, an increase of over 10 percent in the past year.

It predicted that students starting a three-year course this September could face a debt of almost £20,000 at graduation.

A week earlier the National Union of Students (NUS) annual conference was dominated by financial concerns of a different nature. Claims that the NUS is facing bankruptcy had led to a cut in the size of conference and the decision not to hold an anti-fees demonstration in London for the first time in five years. So this year's conference was the smallest, and most dominated by student union sabbaticals (full timers), in years.

Subscribe to RSS - Students