Zimbabwe

Saying no to Zimbabwe's constitution

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Socialist Review spoke to Tafadzwa Choto of the International Socialist Organisation in Zimbabwe about the significance of the recent referendum on a new constitution

Can you explain the background to the constitutional referendum? How far back does it go?

The constitutional question dates back to 15 years ago as Zimbabweans have been demanding a new democratic constitution to replace the 1979 Lancaster House constitution that was negotiated and ushered in at Zimbabwe's independence. Social, economic and political demonstrations by workers, students, peasants, women, war veterans and even by the middle classes, forced the Zanu PF government to accept the need for a new constitution.

A new phase of struggle in post-deal Zimbabwe

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It was difficult to watch the power-sharing deal signing ceremony between Zimbabwe's opposition Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) and the ruling party ZANU-PF on 15 September.

The deal for a "dual cabinet" will see, if the agreement holds, an almost equal split of ministerial posts between the two parties, with the opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai as prime minister.

Despite bludgeoning and stealing his way to election victory Robert Mugabe keeps many of his powers and ZANU-PF, in all probability, will maintain control of the army.

Zimbabwe: Future of the MDC Hangs in the Balance

Zimbabwe's Movement for Democratic Change (MDC), the country's biggest opposition force, is in deep crisis.

At a conference expected soon, there is likely to be blood-letting between factions organised around two men, each of whom claims to be the party's leader. Morgan Tsvangirai and Gibson Sibanda, who have been the MDC's leader and deputy leader for more than five years, are now bitterly at odds. The immediate cause was a push by Tsvangirai for the party to boycott last year's senate elections. He argued that effective democracy no longer existed in Zimbabwe and that participation would simply prettify president Robert Mugabe's crimes.

Zimbabwe: Still Living in Limbo

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Zimbabwe was gripped by depression immediately after the recent election results were announced.

For most people the thought of six more years under Mugabe is a death sentence. For the thousands of people still being beaten and killed by Mugabe's 'youth militias' or facing massive food shortages this is not an exaggeration. People walking the streets of the city are starving. Most are surviving on one meal a day, and the prices of basic commodities are set to rise when the government removes price controls.

Zimbabwe: 'We are Demanding an End to Violence, and Free and Fair Elections'

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A statement from those who are protesting against Robert Mugabe.

Revolutionary greetings, comrades.

On 15 February about 1,500 to 2,000 people attended the 'No to dictatorship - no to neoliberal poverty' demonstration. Earlier the High Court had refused to hear our urgent application against the police for banning the demonstration. However, the demonstration went ahead, but only in Harare--demonstrations in the other towns were cancelled on the day because of the heavy police presence.

Zimbabwe: A Second Cry for Freedom

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This month sees presidential elections in Zimbabwe. Basker Vashee looks at President Mugabe's attempts to stay in power.

At the beginning of the year, war veterans of the Zanu-PF party in Zimbabwe went on a rampage through the townships of Harare. All suspected members of the opposition Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) were systematically beaten, and one was decapitated in front of his family. The police did not intervene. This, like many other acts of violence, was an attempt by the ruling party to intimidate people before the presidential elections to be held in March.

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